“Tham Khoun Xe”.

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Beijing-based photographer Ryan Deboodt (previously) recently returned from a trip to Laos where he spent two days exploring Tham Khoun Xe, one of the largest active rivers caves in the world.
Stretching nearly 4.5 miles (7km) underground, the cave system is extraordinarily remote and Deboodt was permitted to photograph and film beyond where tourists are normally allowed to visit.
The immensity of the subterranean space is staggering, with an average ceiling of almost 200 feet (60m) and width of 250 feet (76m) it’s hard to imagine a space like this could exist underground.
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Deboodt brought an arsenal of camera and video equipment as well as a drone to capture the expansive interiors of Tham Khoun Xe.

See more images via A Trip by Air and Kayak Through Tham Khoun Xe, One of the Largest Active River Caves on Earth | Colossal

“The Invisible Men of Everest.”

79040-cb1234These are times of crucial change for Sherpa culture, and in particular for the subculture of the Sherpa climbing community.
Since Sherpas first were hired away from their potato farms to carry loads for an expedition in 1907, Sherpa culture has arguably been more influenced by the Western passion for mountaineering than by any other single force.
In less than a century, they have come from wondering about the sanity of the mikaru, their term for foreign climbers, to being among the best mountaineers in the world themselves.
Sherpas hold speed records on Everest. They work as guides on Denali and Mount Rainier. In 2012, Mingma and Chhang Dawa Sherpa of Seven Summit Treks became the first two brothers to climb all 14 of the world’s 8,000-meter (26,000-foot) peaks.
It’s hard to imagine that the Sherpa porters on the British expeditions to the Tibet side of Everest in the 1920s did not even have a word for “summit.”
Instead, they were convinced, as Wade Davis notes in his book Into the Silence: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest, that the foreigners were treasure hunters searching for a statue of a golden cow or yak to melt down for coins.

“The Himalayas”.

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Equipped with the most-advanced gyro stabilized camera in the world, the team at Teton Gravity Research flew from Kathmandu to Mount Everest, capturing the first ultra HD footage ever shot above 20,000 feet.
I’ve never seen these mountains look so beautiful.
Geography
The Himalayas are bordered on the north by the Tibetan Plateau, on the south by the Indo-Gangetic Plain, on the northwest by the Karakoram and Hindu Kush ranges, and on the east by the Indian state of Assam, Arunachal Pradesh.
The western anchor of the Himalayas — Nanga Parbat — lies just south of the northernmost bend of the Indus River, while the eastern anchor — Namcha Barwa — is situated just west of the great bend of the Yarlung Tsangpo River.
The Himalayas span five countries: India, Nepal, Bhutan, China (Tibet), and Pakistan, with the first three countries having sovereignty over most of the range. (via Wikipedia).
via The Clearest Aerial Shots Of The Himalayas, Ever.

“Ice Cave.”

iceOverall winner – Nature – Open Entries
Max says, “This six-shot panorama was taken in the Himalayas during spring.
It was a small distant gap in a snow-covered mountain which caught my attention.
I mainly wanted to check it out because this ice or snow cave had a view on the 6812m-high Ama Dablam.
Photo credit: Max Rive (Netherlands) / The EPSON International Pano Awards
See more images via Award-winning nature panoramas from around the world

Women of North Korea.

MihaelaNoroc1Over two years ago, Romanian photographer Mihaela Noroc embarked on an ambitious quest to document diverse examples of beauty around the world through stunning portraits of women from more than 37 countries.
Her journey has taken her to a diverse range of lands, including Tibet, Iran, Brazil, and the US, but her latest destination is particularly noteworthy—none other than North Korea, the isolated and rarely photographed East Asian nation.
Traveling to cities like Pyongyang, Sinuiju, and Wonsan, Noroc had the remarkable opportunity to expand her series The Atlas of Beauty to include the women of North Korea.
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Her subjects range from waitresses to students to factory workers, providing a unique look at some of the 24.9 million people who live in the country.
“North Korean women are not familiar with global trends, but this doesn’t mean that they are not preoccupied with their look. They are, definitely!” the photographer wrote on Bored Panda.
“They have a passion for high heels and usually wear classic outfits, always accompanied by a pin, on the chest, representing one of the country’s leaders.
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During celebrations and other special occasions, they wear traditional colorful outfits.”Noroc is raising funds via Indiegogo so she can continue her travels around the world until she has enough material for a book.
She says, “My goal is to continue and take photos of women from each country of the globe, showing that beauty is in our differences.”
See more Images via “Atlas of Beauty” Photographer Provides a Rare Look at Women in North Korea – My Modern Met

“The Art of Khoa Lee”.

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I absolutely find Khoa Lee’s work enthralling and insanely delightful. 
See more Wonderful Images at Khoa Lee’s Website
http://bit.ly/1lKBnTq