‘Losing the Fight’ by Aaron Gekoski.

Losing the Fight by Aaron Gekoski (UK)
Orangutans have been used in degrading performances at Safari World, Bangkok, and many other locations for decades.
Such shows were temporarily stopped in 2004 amid international pressure but they have since resumed – taking place twice a day, every day – with hundreds of people paying to watch the the clever animals box, dance, play the drums and more
Image Credit: Photograph: Aaron Gekoski,/2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year
Source: Wildlife photographer of the year: Lumix people’s choice shortlist 2019 – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

World’s Deepest Cave.

krubera-cave-3[1]Krubera Cave, also known as Voronya Cave (Russian for “Crow’s Cave”) is the deepest known cave on Earth.
It is located in the Arabika Massif, one of the largest high-mountain limestone karst massifs in the Western Caucasus region of Georgia.
This mountain block contains several hundred caves that started to develop when the mountains started to rise more than 5 million years ago.
Five of these caves are deeper than 1,000 meters; Krubera is 2197 meters deep and is the only known cave on Earth deeper than 2,000 meters.
Krubera Cave is a 16,058 meters long cave system which for most part consists of deep, vertical wells which are interconnected with passages. The cave starts high in the mountains, at an altitude of 2,256 meters, with a narrow entrance.
Krubera Cave often is very narrow and had to be carved at many places to allow safe passage. At other places, the passageway is as large as subway tunnel.
krubera-cave-4[1]Source: Wondermodo / Wikipedia. Photo courtesy: Avaxnews
Read further via Krubera Cave – The World’s Deepest Cave | Amusing Planet.

Capturing the Fireflies of Japan.

When you see a firefly, it’s only for a moment. The bright light blinks and vanishes until it magically appears a few feet away.
But photographer Kei Nomiyama freezes the dance with long exposures that make hundreds of fireflies appear suspended in mid-air.
Nomiyama is an environmental science professor, but loves to spend his free time photographing the world he studies. “I became a scientist to protect nature, and I have an interest in photography to record nature,” he says.
The fireflies thrive in the forests of Shikoku Island where Nomiyama lives, and he’s spent the last eight years documenting their mating ritual with his camera.
The fireflies are most abundant during Japan’s rainy season between May and June, where they live a brief but beautiful two-week adult life.

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During that period, Nomiyama makes frequent into the forests around central Shikoku Island, seeking the perfect patch of trees or river for his shoot.
Once he finds a location, Nomiyama makes long exposures up to 30 minutes with his Canon EOS 5D Mark III and Sony Alpha a7R II.
Later, he digitally composites multiple frames together.
The final images are overflowing with hundreds of tiny lights. In the early 20th century, firefly hunters captured thousands of the insects to illuminate hotels and private gardens in Tokyo.
Nomiyama just needs his camera.

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See more images via Dazzling Long Exposures Capture the Fireflies of Japan | WIRED