‘Iceberg Graveyard’ by Josselin Cornou.

Image Credit: ‘Tabular iceberg” Photograph by Josselin Cornou, France, Shortlist, Open, Nature (Photo: 2017 Sony World Photography Awards)
“On our way to the 66 parallel south — in Antarctica — we discovered a recent iceberg graveyard,” explains French photographer Josselin Cornou.
“A massive part (as large as a U.S. state) of the ice shelf broke down a few years ago due to global warming, displaying a splendid but scary visual
Those icebergs are about 100 feet tall from the sea level, transporting big amount of fresh water, waiting to be dissolved in the ocean.
The scene was magnificent, but also incredibly scary.”
Source: 12 breathtaking images from the Sony World Photography Awards | MNN – Mother Nature Network

Trinity Church, King George Island.

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Photo: James L. Boka on Wikipedia)
This strange little church, perched on the black sands of King George Island, looks like something out of Harry Potter, but is actually the southernmost Orthodox Christian church in the world.
It was built by the Russians in the 1990s to minister to their permanent settlement in Antarctica, Bellingshausen Station.
Manned by a couple of volunteer priests at all times, the chapel also serves a number of other international bases in the area.
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Unlike most of the squat, unadorned buildings in Antarctica, the church brings a warm dose of old world flare to the island, and seems almost miraculous amongst the harsh surrounds.
via Chill Out at These 9 Antarctic Outposts | Atlas Obscura.

Extinct Mega Penguin was two metres Tall.

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Forget emperor penguins, say hello to the colossus penguin.
Newly unearthed fossils have revealed that Antarctica was once home to the biggest species of penguin ever discovered. It was 2 metres long and weighed a hefty 115 kilograms.
Palaeeudyptes klekowskii lived 37 to 40 million years ago.
This was “a wonderful time for penguins, when 10 to 14 species lived together along the Antarctic coast”, says Carolina Acosta Hospitaleche of the La Plata Museum in Argentina.
She has been excavating fossil deposits on Seymour Island, off the Antarctic peninsula.
This was a warmer region 40 million years ago, with a climate like that of present-day Tierra del Fuego, the islands at the southern tip of South America.
Now she has uncovered two bigger bones. One is part of a wing, and the other is a tarsometatarsus, formed by the fusion of ankle and foot bones. The tarsometatarsus measures a record 9.1 centimetres.
Based on the relative sizes of bones in penguin skeletons, Acosta Hospitaleche estimates P. klekowskii was 2.01 metres long from beak tip to toes.
Its height will have been somewhat less than its length owing to the way penguins stand. But it was nevertheless larger than any known penguin.
via Extinct mega penguin was tallest and heaviest ever – New Scientist.

Frozen in Ice, Maxwell Bay.

mar-sem-fim-14[6]by Kaushik
Mar Sem Fim (“Endless Sea” in English) is a Brazilian yacht that was shipwrecked, sunk and subsequently got frozen in ice in Maxwell Bay of Ardley Cove, Antarctica, about 1,200 kilometres south of the tip of South America, in April 7th, 2012.
The yacht that belonged to the famed Brazilian journalist and entrepreneur João Lara Mesquita, was manned by four crew who were filming a documentary off the Antarctic coast when the boat capsized.
Strong winds in excess of 100-kilometer per hour had tossed the boat from one side to the other “like a bucking bronco in a rodeo,” according to one crew member.
With their vessel trapped in ice, the crew radioed for help and was received by the Chilean navy in the base in Bahia Fildes, in Antarctica.
All four researchers were eventually rescued but bad weather delayed the process by two days.
João Lara Mesquita, who was also in the yacht, wrote in his blog:
“Then, with strong winds and high waves, the boat Frei came to us. Our evacuation was epic.
Waves of more than 1.5 meters and winds over 40 knots made the boat jump from one side to another, like a bucking bronco. When it got close, each of us … threw ourselves into the arms of three Chilean crew members. Fortunately all went safely.”
via Amusing Planet – Amazing Places, Wonderful People, Weird Stuff.

The Ice Monster.

The Ice Monster by Laurent Ballesta, France.
Laurent and his expedition team were working out of the Dumont d’Urville scientific base in east Antarctica.
Ice shelves in the East Antarctic ice sheet are melting faster than scientists assumed.
When Laurent spotted this small iceberg, he saw the chance to show for the first time the underwater part. I
t took three days to check the location, install a grid of lines from the seabed to buoys (so that Laurent could maintain a definite distance) and take the series of pictures to capture the scene.
Source: Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017 – the winners | Environment | The Guardian

Stand Out from the Crowd.

The BES photography contest features images by ecologists and students and captures rare flora and fauna from around the world.
Overall winner: Stand Out From the Crowd
Photographed on Marion Island (Prince Edward Islands).
An adult king penguin is surrounded by chicks at a large breeding colony.
Populations of the species inhabiting Sub-antarctic islands face an uncertain future, as climate change threatens to shift oceanic fronts where the animals feed, pushing them further away from breeding sites
Photograph: Chris Oosthuizen/University of Pretoria/British Ecological Society
Source: Capturing Ecology: British Ecological Society photo competition – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian