The Ice Monster, east Antarctica by Laurent Ballesta.

The Ice Monster by Laurent Ballesta, France.
Laurent and his expedition team were working out of the Dumont d’Urville scientific base in east Antarctica.
Ice shelves in the East Antarctic ice sheet are melting faster than scientists assumed.
When Laurent spotted this small iceberg, he saw the chance to show for the first time the underwater part. I
t took three days to check the location, install a grid of lines from the seabed to buoys (so that Laurent could maintain a definite distance) and take the series of pictures to capture the scene.
Source: Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017 – the winners | Environment | The Guardian

Iceberg Graveyard in Antarctica by Josselin Cornou.

Image Credit: ‘Tabular iceberg” Photograph by Josselin Cornou, France, Shortlist, Open, Nature (Photo: 2017 Sony World Photography Awards)
“On our way to the 66 parallel south — in Antarctica — we discovered a recent iceberg graveyard,” explains French photographer Josselin Cornou.
“A massive part (as large as a U.S. state) of the ice shelf broke down a few years ago due to global warming, displaying a splendid but scary visual
Those icebergs are about 100 feet tall from the sea level, transporting big amount of fresh water, waiting to be dissolved in the ocean.
The scene was magnificent, but also incredibly scary.”
Source: 12 breathtaking images from the Sony World Photography Awards | MNN – Mother Nature Network

Ice Cave on the Erubus Glacer, Ross Island, Antarctica.

Ross Island, Antartic
An ice cave on the Erebus Glacier. A secret world of animals and plants may live in warm caves under Antarctica’s glaciers, including new species, scientists believe.
Photograph: Joel Bensing/AFP/Getty Images
Source: A Tiger dance and a washout at Bestival – Friday’s fantastic photos | News | The Guardian

Ice Cavern, Adelie Land, circa 1913.

Capture
Photograph: On the Frozen Sea in a Cavern Eaten Out by the Waves Under the Coastal Ice-cliffs, Adelie Land, Australian Antarctic Expedition c.1913
by Frank Hurley.
In 1911, Australian explorer Douglas Mawson left Sydney on a three-year Antarctic expedition.
On board was Australian photographer Frank Hurley.
Here, along the shore of Antarctica’s Adelie Land, Hurley captures a long cave hollowed out by waves.
Source: Gallery: The underground Australia

Aurora over Mawson Station, Antarctica.

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“Aurora Over Mawson Station”
See more images via Antarctic photographic exhibition “The Fortress” – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Mysterious Blood Falls.

Blood Falls, named for its ruddy colour, is not, in fact, a gush of blood from some unseen wound.
The colour was initially chalked up to red algae, but a new study in the Journal of Glaciology has uncovered its true origin using radar to scan the layers of ice from which the river pours.
Located in Antarctica’s McMurdo Dry Valleys, the falls pour forth from Taylor Glacier, and the liquid bubbles up from fissures in the glacier’s surface.
The flow was previously a mystery, as the mean temperature is -17 degrees Celsius and little glacial melting can be seen at the surface.
Imaging from underneath the glacier helped solve the mystery, revealing a complex network of subglacial rivers and a subglacial lake—all filled with brine high in iron, giving the falls its reddish tint.
According to the study, the makeup of the brine explains the fact that it flows instead of freezes.“The brine remains liquid within the subglacial and englacial environments through latent heat of freezing coupled with elevated salt content,” the study explains.
Read further via What’s Really In Antarctica’s Mysterious Blood Falls | Nature | National Geographic Australia – National Geographic