Lion Guardians: Maasai Warriors help protect Lions.

Maasai warrior Kamunu Saitoti scans the Kenyan rangelands for a signal from a number of lions that have been fitted with radio collars.
Saitoti is part of an organisation called Lion Guardians, a conservation initiative started in 2007 to find ways for the Maasai and lions to coexist.
Scientists estimate that lion populations in Africa have fallen by more than 40% in the past 20 years and the 20,000 or so wild lions that remain occupy just 8% of the species’ historical range.
Image Credit: Photograph by Marcus Westberg/Life Through A Lens.
Source: Travel photo of the week: the warriors helping to protect lions in Kenya | Travel | The Guardian

Foxes and Owls in Finland by Konsta Punkka.

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Twenty-one year-old Finnish photographer Konsta Punkka takes breathtaking pictures of nature and lifestyle.
We’ve written about him previously, but just can’t seem to get enough of his photos of wild animals.
Punkka manages to capture the animals from so close, it’s unbelievable. His secret?
He brings snacks to the photoshoots and feeds them to the animals.

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“The feeding thing in my photographs is more like a thing I want to show to the people, that the animals trust me and they allow me to get really close to them.
I don’t feed these guys much, just a few peanuts to get them stay close to me to take the shots”, Punkka told Bored Panda.

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More info: Instagram | 500px
See more images via Photographer Captures The Soul Of The Forest With His Unbelievably Intimate Animal Shots | Bored Panda

“Why does your Pussy Purr?”

purring-kittyIs your feline friend purring because he’s happy, or could it be something else? (Photo: Travis Modisette/flickr)
It’s easy to assume that cats purr because they’re happy. After all, when your kitty contentedly curls up in your lap for some well-deserved scratches and rubs, she’s obviously one happy feline.
However, cats also purr when they’re frightened or feel threatened, such as during a visit to the vet. Veterinarian Kelly Morgan equates this reaction with smiling.
“People will smile when they’re nervous, when they want something, and when they’re happy, so perhaps the purr can also be an appeasing gesture,” Morgan told WebMD.
A cat’s purr begins in its brain. A repetitive neural oscillator sends messages to the laryngeal muscles, causing them to twitch at a rate of 25 to 150 vibrations per second.
This causes the vocal cords to separate when the cat inhales and exhales, producing a purr. But not all cats can purr. Domestic cats, some wild cats and their relatives — civets, genets and mongooses — purr, and even hyenas, raccoons and guinea pigs can purr.
However, cats that purr can’t roar, and cats that roar can’t purr because the structures surrounding roaring cats’ larynxes aren’t stiff enough to allow purring. Roaring cats evolved this way for good reason.
These cats move around a lot to catch prey, so they developed their roar to protect their prides and their territory.
Purring cats, on the other hand, are smaller and more likely to be loners that don’t have to compete with each other for prey. They use scent to mark territory and don’t need a far-reaching way to communicate.
However, your cat may also purr to communicate with you. According to researchers at the University of Sussex, domestic cats can hide a plaintive cry within their purrs that irritates their humans while appealing to their nurturing instincts.
The team examined the sound spectrum of 10 cats’ purrs and found an unusual peak in the 220- to 520-hertz frequency range embedded in the lower frequencies of the usual purr. Babies’ cries have a similar frequency range at 300 to 600 hertz.
Karen McComb, who headed the study, said cats may be exploiting “innate tendencies in humans to respond to cry-like sounds in the context of nurturing offspring.
”Why would your feline do this? “Cats apparently learn to do this to get people to feed them sooner,” said veterinarian Benjamin L. Hart.Cats’ purrs are more than simply a way to communicate though.
Scientists like Elizabeth von Muggenthaler, a bioacoustics researcher, believe that cats also purr to heal themselves.
Read on via Why do cats purr? | MNN – Mother Nature Network

A Friendly Race at Watego’s Beach, Byron Bay.

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Looks like this lonely kayaker has some friendly competition for the next wave at Watego’s Beach, Byron Bay, in New South Wales, Australia
Image Credit: Photo by ABC Open contributor Sean O’Shea
Source: Dropping in – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The Wolverine is a super Predator in the Snow.

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Photo: Gulo, Wikimedia Commons.
Anatomically, the wolverine is a stocky and muscular animal. With short legs, broad and rounded head, small eyes and short rounded ears, it resembles a bear more than other mustelids.
Though its legs are short, its large, five-toed paws and plantigrade posture facilitate movement through deep snow.
The adult wolverine is about the size of a medium dog, with a length usually ranging from 65–107 cm, a tail of 17–26 cm, and a weight of 9–25 kg, though exceptionally large males can weigh up to 32 kg.
The males are as much as 30% larger than the females and can be twice the females’ weight. Shoulder height is reported from 30 to 45 cm.
It is the largest of terrestrial mustelids; only the marine-dwelling sea otter and giant otter of the Amazon basin are larger.
Wolverines have thick, dark, oily fur which is highly hydrophobic, making it resistant to frost. This has led to its traditional popularity among hunters and trappers as a lining in jackets and parkas in Arctic conditions.
A light-silvery facial mask is distinct in some individuals, and a pale buff stripe runs laterally from the shoulders along the side and crossing the rump just above a 25–35 cm. bushy tail.
Some individuals display prominent white hair patches on their throats or chests.
Like many other mustelids, it has potent anal scent glands used for marking territory and sexual signaling. The pungent odor has given rise to the nicknames “skunk bear” and “nasty cat.”
Wolverines, like other mustelids, possess a special upper molar in the back of the mouth that is rotated 90 degrees, towards the inside of the mouth.
This special characteristic allows wolverines to tear off meat from prey or carrion that has been frozen solid.
The wolverine is a powerful and versatile predator and scavenger.
Prey mainly consists of small to medium-sized mammals, but the wolverine has been recorded killing prey such as adult deer that are many times larger than itself.
Prey species include porcupines, squirrels, beavers, marmots, rabbits, voles, mice, shrews, lemmings, caribou, roe deer, white-tailed deer, mule deer, sheep, moose, and elk.
Smaller predators are occasionally preyed on, including martens, mink, foxes, Eurasian lynx, weasels, and coyote and wolf pups.
Wolverines often pursue live prey that are relatively easy to obtain, including animals caught in traps, newborn mammals, and deer (including adult moose and elk) when they are weakened by winter or immobilized by heavy snow.
via Wolverine – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

“Kindness during the Action”.

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Bedded down somewhere in the Pacific during the mayhem and fierce fighting against the Japanese army during World War II, this American soldier takes time out to show some kindness by feeding a banana to a battle weary goat.
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