Glaciers, Fjords & Wildlife.

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Harbor seals bask on an iceberg as the fog rolls in near Bear Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park. Photo credit: Jonathan Irish
A lot of people ask us what has been our favorite park so far this year and that question is practically impossible to answer because each park is so special in its own way.
Perhaps a better way to answer that question, or to even ask it of ourselves, is to tweak it a bit—“what park would you have wished you had more time to spend in and definitely want to go back to?”

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That seems more appropriate… Kenai Fjords National Park in Alaska is definitely one of them.
This park and its surrounding area has some huge draws for the outdoor set—great camping, a cool local scene, and pristine Alaskan wilderness sprawling into the mountains and to the seas.
These are just a few of the reasons people want to visit the Kenai Peninsula.
The things that motivate us to return are the experiences had while there… once you experience the landscape, you will undoubtedly want to explore it more in a variety of different ways.
Source: Glaciers, Fjords, and Wildlife: 3 Adventures in Kenai Fjords National Park | The Huffington Post

Naknek Alaska Eagle.

Image Credit: Photograph by Cindy Upchurch
Congratulations to Cindy Upchurch for winning the recent Discovery Landscape Photography Assignment with the image, “Naknek Alaska Eagle.
”This was taken in Naknek, Alaska, on Bristol Bay during the salmon run of July 2018,” says Upchurch. “This was a new location for me as I had never seen so many eagles nor been in Naknek.
The eagles were on the beach and cliffs/bluffs just waiting for the fish to be caught in the nets. It was quite amazing.“The bluffs along the bay were mostly brown and blended in with the eagles’ feathers, making composition a challenge.
Light was important for the eagles to show their brilliant shades of browns against the brown cliffs. Trying to get different expressions from the eagles and against the dark background took a fast shutter and steady hands.
With the hundreds of eagle pictures I took during this time, I love the fact that this eagle took the light on this high cliff in the middle of these white wildflowers and green grass during morning hours.”
Source: Discovery Landscape Photography Assignment Winner Cindy Upchurch – Outdoor Photographer

Ruth Glacier, Central Alaska.

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Photo Credit:
http://goo.gl/et7dQl
The Ruth Glacier, in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska, covers an enormous area in the heart of the central Alaska Range.
Located about 3 miles vertically below the summit of Mt. McKinley, it catches all the snow that falls on the southeast side of the mountain, and as the accumulated snow and ice that makes up the glacier slides down the slope, it get squeezed through a one-mile-wide bottleneck of what is called the Great Gorge.
The Great Gorge is one of the most spectacular gorges on earth. It runs for a length of 16 km and drops almost 2,000 feet over the distance, creating a grade that forces the Ruth Glacier to descend at an impressive pace of a meter a day.
On either side of the gorge are solid granite cliffs that tower 5,000 feet above the glacier’s surface. The depth of the ice within the gorge is more than 3,800 feet.
If the ice were to melt tomorrow, it could create an abyss 2.6 km deep or more than one-half times deeper than the Grand Canyon.
The mountain lining the walls of the Great Gorge rises sporadically into towering spires and has been given names such as Moose’s Tooth, Broken Tooth, Bear Tooth and Wisdom Tooth, to name a few, and really look like animals’ teeth.
So immense are these spires that what appear to be tiny flakes on these walls are actually ledges wide enough to park a tractor trailer.
As the Ruth Glacier flows down a steeper gradient, it tears and fractures into a treacherous 10-square mile section known as the Ruth Ice Fall near the bottom of the Great Gorge.
During summer after the snowmelt, this section becomes virtually impassable.
via The Great Gorge of the Ruth Glacier | Amusing Planet.

White Bears at the Kaktovic Islands.

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Polar bears congregate on the barrier islands of Kaktovik in northern Alaska every fall to partake in leftovers from Inupiat (northern Eskimo community) whaling before the Beaufort Sea freezes and they move on to hunt seal.
”It was a surreal experience,” says photographer Laura Keene, ”to be in the presence of these magnificent creatures.”
Image Credit: Photograph by Laura Keene, National Geographic Your Shot
See more Images via The Best of Your Shot: Eight Awesome Animal Photos | PROOF.

Mendenhall Caves.

c1photograph by AER Wilmington DE
The receding Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska has been gradually melting away, revealing an ancient forest, as well as these gorgeous ice caves.
On the interior, water pools in alien-like grottoes and drips over the curved overhangs to create rippling effects like stained glass.
It’s just 12 miles from downtown Juneau, but adventurers must first take a kayak and then ice climb in order to experience the temporary wonder.
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photograph by AER Wilmington DE 
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photograph by AER Wilmington DE
Read on further via Deep Freeze: Six Astonishing Ice Caves | Atlas Obscura.

The American Black Bear.

An American black bear salmon fishing
While on an Alaskan cruise my wife chose an excursion where we flew by float plane from Ketchikan to Neets Bay in the Tongas National Forest to hopefully see some ‘wild’ black bears in their natural habitat salmon fishing.
We were not disappointed
Image Credit: Photograp by JennerTaylor/GuardianWitness
Source: Born free: readers’ photos on the theme of wild | Community | The Guardian