Rescued Gorilla and friend move to New Sanctuary.

A gorilla in the hands of her carer as they drive to a new and larger sanctuary run for the care of orphaned or captive apes rescued by Ape Action Africa in Cameroon.
Image Credit: Photograph by Jo-Anne McArthur/Photographers Against Wildlife Crime.
Source: Photographers against wildlife crime – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

Last South African coelacanths threatened by oil exploration.

Coelacanths have remained almost unchanged for 420m years.
Photograph: Alamy Stock PhotoBright blue,
Older than dinosaurs and weighing as much as an average-sized man, coelacanths are the most endangered fish in South Africa and among the rarest in the world.
Barely 30 of these critically-endangered fish are known to exist off the east coast of South Africa, raising concern that a new oil exploration venture in the area could jeopardise their future.
Coelacanths, whose shape has remained almost unchanged for 420m years, captured world attention when the first living specimen was caught off the port city of East London in 1938.
This discovery was followed by the subsequent capture of several more off the Comoros islands in the early 1950s, confirming that coelacanths were definitely not extinct.Shelf Life:
”The Sodwana coelacanths are about 40km from the northern boundary of the Eni exploration area and nearly 200km north of the first drilling sites, but Venter said oil spills spread far and swiftly.His concerns have been echoed by the coelacanth expert Prof Mike Bruton, who said the fish are specialist creatures, sensitive to environmental disturbance.

Photograph: Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images
“Anything that interferes with their ability to absorb oxygen, such as oil pollution, would threaten their survival. The risk of oil spills or blowouts during exploration or futur is a source of serious concern.”
Source: Older than dinosaurs: last South African coelacanths threatened by oil exploration | Environment | The Guardian

Among The Clouds, Abu Dhabi.

Image Credit: Photograph by Khalid Al Hammadi
The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in the United Arab Emirates conjures up memories of Fairy tale stories such as Sinbad the Sailor and Aladdin.
That was the first impression that came to my mind when I was there taking this photo, the view was incredible, a perfect structure with an amazing huge wave of fog surrounding it.
I wish that all of you were there with me, standing together, and enjoying this beautiful view, one where nature embraces architecture.
Source: Among The Clouds Photo by Khalid Al Hammadi — National Geographic Your Shot

Elephants in search of Green Pastures.

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As the sun sets over the African nation of Zimbabwe, a herd of elephants journey over the plains near the Limpopo River.
Venturing across this “soft but harsh and beautiful and endless” landscape, as described by Your Shot photographer Jetje Japhet, the elephants were likely in search of food or water.
“I was lucky to be there” to capture this image, Japhet writes.
Photograph By Jetje Japhet, National Geographic Your Shot
Source: Something’s in the Way

Two Rhinos & a cheeky Oxpecker.

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Photograph by Matt Parry, runner-up.
On an early morning safari drive in the Amakhala game reserve, South Africa, we came across these two rhinos coming out of the mist.
A little bird is hitching a ride with one of the rhinos.
Comment by Mick Ryan, Judge: Is there any species more prehistoric-looking than the endangered white rhino.
This beautiful image, including the little oxpecker, a bird that feeds on ticks on the bodies of large mammals, is both majestic and sad.
Photography can document what is precious to us and be a starting point for action that will save the Earth and the living things that inhabit it.
Source: Readers’ travel photography competition: October – the winners | Travel | The Guardian

High Sands and High Seas, Namibia.

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Image Credit: Photograph by Julian Walter, National Geographic Your Shot
Namibia, on Africa’s southwest coast, is a large country with a harsh landscape.
The towering and constantly shifting dunes of the Namib Desert, shown here in this aerial photo submitted by Your Shot member Julian Walter, run right to the Atlantic Ocean and can reach up to a thousand feet high.
Source: Photo of the Day: Best of April – PROOF