The Dragon’s Blood Trees of Socotra Island.

Dragon’s Blood trees, known locally as Dam al-Akhawain, or blood of the two brothers, on Socotra island.
Prized for its red medicinal sap, the Dragon’s Blood is the most striking of 900 plant species on the Socotra islands in the Arabian Sea, 380 km (238 miles) south of mainland Yemen.
Image Credit: Photograph by Khaled Abdullah Ali Al Mahdi / Reuters
Source: A Walk in the Woods: A Photo Appreciation of Trees – The Atlantic

Silhouettes of African animals at sunrise and sunset.

Wildlife photographer Greg Du Toit has captured powerful images of silhouetted animals in southern and eastern Africa to show “the mystery and intrigue of Africa.”
Images copyright Greg Du Toit/mediadrumworld.com.
The animals, including lions, giraffes, flamingos, elephants, leopards, rhinoceros and zebras, are illuminated against sunrises and sunsets in a range of hues.
The photos are part of a wider series called Dusk to Dawn and were shot in Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Tanzania, Kenya and Zambia.
Mr Du Toit told Media Drum news agency: “I simply want to convey the incredible diversity, mystery and wonder that I feel for my wild subjects.
“What the camera has the power to do, through silhouette photography, is to simply de-clutter our world.”
Du Toit specialises in lowlight imagery, spending hours to get the perfect timings for his photos.
Du Toit previously won the Wildlife Photographer of the Year prize in 2013, with his photo entitled Essence of Elephants.
See more of Greg Du Toit’s work on Instagram
Source: Stunning silhouettes show animals of Africa at sunrise and sunset – BBC News

Buffaloes & Stars, KwaZulu-Natal.

‘Buffaloes and stars’.
This picture, taken at Zimanga game reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, using an in-camera multiple exposure, with the first lit for the buffaloes and the second focused on the stars with a spectacular result.
Image Credit: Photograph by Andreas Hemb.
Source: Sony world photography awards 2017 shortlist | Art and design | The Guardian

‘Vulture Showdown’, Transfrontier Park.

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It was midday, and Peter had arrived at a waterhole in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa. Scores of white-backed and lappet-faced vultures covered an eland carcass, squabbling over the meat. ‘Two things hit me simultaneously,’ says Peter. ‘The vile stench of rotting flesh and the intense buzz of flies.’
The white-backed vultures were surprisingly violent as they vied for the best feeding positions. This particular individual had backed off from a fight but was about to re-enter the fray. Covered in dust, wings spread, head lowered, it reminded Peter of a gladiator in his chariot, lining up for a charge.
Its picture is a portrayal of the true character of this feisty bird.
Photo: Peter Delaney (Ireland).

Amazone Women – Senegal by YZ.

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)
According to historical accounts of the First Franco-Dahomean War, in the 1890s it was the highly trained military women who were chopping off the heads of the French.
Sometimes while they slept.
French Street Artist YZ Yseult has begun her own campaign to pay tribute to the fierce female fighters of the 19th Century West African country of Dahomey, who are more commonly referred to as Amazons.
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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)
A startling narrative of female power not often heard today for some, but as YZ is researching her own history as a descendent from slaves, her portraits reflect a personal impetus to tell these stories with a new force.
She has named this series of strong warriors on the street “Amazone”.
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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)
Read on via French Street Artist YZ Brings “Amazone” Women to Walls in Senegal.