Baby Baboon saved by Brave Paents.

Photographer Evan Schiller and Lisa Holzwarth were on a game drive in the northern Botswana’s Selinda Camp when they came across a big troop of baboons charging through the bush.
“30-40 baboons were heading in our general direction making a lot of noise,” Lisa recalls.
The baboons were obviously frightened by something and they all scampered up trees, shouting, alarming, and making a big scene. It quickly became clear what the problem was: two large lionesses came out of the tall grass and rushed the baboons into the trees, soon joined by two more lionesses.
“Between the baboons shrieking and the lionesses communicating with deep guttural roars, it was a mad scene,” Lisa says.
But then the real chaos began! One brave baboon descended the dead tree and tried to make a run for it… but got snapped up in the jaws of a lioness.
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You will see the baby baboon still hanging on to its mother although she is in the vice like grip of the lioness. And then this happens…
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Finally, the baby is rescued by its father who grabs the tiny baboon when the lioness is distracted and rushes up a tree to safety.
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A terrifying experience for the youngster, who is protected by the sheer bravery of  Dad and the sacrifice of its mother.
via Baby Baboon’s Frightening Encounter with Lions Ends with a Heroic Twist – News Watch.

The Vanishing Northern White Rhino.

6896The last known male northern white rhinoceros at the Ol Pejeta conservancy in Laikipia County, Kenya.
The conservancy is home to the planet’s last-three northern white rhinoceros.
As 2016 draws to an end, awareness of the devastation of poaching is greater than ever and countries have turned to high-tech warfare — drones, night-goggles and automatic weapons — to stop increasingly armed poachers.
Photograph: Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images
See more images via The week in wildlife – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

The Hunter by Konrad Wothe.

The Hunter by Konrad Wothe
Leopards are among the most popular portrait subjects for photographers. But since leopards normally sleep during the day, most portraits show them reclining, usually draped over a branch.
Rarely does a portrait reveal the fluid grace of a leopard in motion. To create such a shot required planning.
The photographer stayed for more than a week in Tanzania’s Serengeti national park and got to know the leopard’s hunting area and where she was likely to rest. He also knew she would climb down from her sleeping tree at dusk to begin hunting.
This was in the days of film, the 1990s, when a picture could be taken after sundown only with the use of a low speed and a wide aperture to capture the last of the light.
Working with rather than against the inevitable grain that would result, the photographer enhanced the sense of movement by panning the camera along with the stride of the leopard, keeping the focus on her eye.
The result was a painterly representation and a prize‑winning picture that has stood the test of time.
Source: Wildlife Photographer of the Year: stories behind classic portraits | Environment | The Guardian