Woman and Child, Pibor, South Sudan.

Pibor, South Sudan
A displaced woman looks at her child, who is hiding behind her dress, in a school now occupied by internally displaced people after heavy rains and floods forced hundreds of thousands of people to leave their homes in the town of Pibor.
Photograph: Andreea Câmpeanu/Reuters
Source: 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian

Camel Caravan at Sunset, Morocco.

fqysubvfts-t7ps2vp2wnkyn8wxywmxty0-fwsgxq077khvj0tsdb2juhbioaq5hgkdihutd36b_wty1fqwurtd6g7j_eowclqluructzgmzgdre7cesfxf00vkjiflhrpax-s7bif4layymjsu0xalpeu3xq0flbjcctnkum0rqg0wbcyfcxwybwvk45jlazecijkrj
Image Credit: Photograph by Moussa Idrissi
In the Merzouga sand dunes in the south of the kingdom of Morocco, around sunset.
It was my chance meeting with a caravan of camels guided by a nomad of the region, and which magically caught my eye.
So as I admired the beautiful sunset, I found myself in good company and I could not miss the opportunity to take some pictures because all the elements were well set.
So, I clicked the trigger to immortalize this hypnotic moment in the Merzouga sand dunes
Source: Hypnotic desert II Photo by Moussa Idrissi — National Geographic Your Shot

Desert Tawny Owl discovered.

image_2432e-desert-tawny-owl-strix-hadorami
Image credit: © Thomas Krumenacker, www.krumenacker.de.
The newly-discovered species, named the Desert Tawny Owl, belongs to the earless owl genus, Strix.
It is a medium-sized owl, 30 to 33 centimeters long, and weighing 140 to 220 grams.
It resembles the Hume’s Owl (Strix butleri) and the Tawny Owl (Strix aluco) in plumage pattern and proportions.
The species’ scientific name, Strix hadorami, honors Israeli ornithologist and writer Hadoram Shirihai.
“It is a special pleasure to name this bird for Hadoram Shirihai, a much-valued colleague and collaborator for 20 years,” Dr Schweizer and his colleagues wrote in a paper in the journal Zootaxa.
“Although Hadoram’s ornithological interests are staggeringly wide-ranging, his name is arguably particularly synonymous with this wonderful owl of wild places in the Middle East.
He discovered, when still a young boy, a live but poisoned specimen (of the Desert Tawny Owl) in En Gedi, which became the first individual to be held in captivity and is now a skeleton in the Tel Aviv University Museum.”
Read on via Desert Tawny Owl: New Species of Bird Discovered | Biology | Sci-News.com.

Amazone Women – Senegal by YZ.

brooklyn-street-art-yz-yseult-senegal-web-8

YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)
According to historical accounts of the First Franco-Dahomean War, in the 1890s it was the highly trained military women who were chopping off the heads of the French.
Sometimes while they slept.
French Street Artist YZ Yseult has begun her own campaign to pay tribute to the fierce female fighters of the 19th Century West African country of Dahomey, who are more commonly referred to as Amazons.
brooklyn-street-art-yz-yseult-senegal-web-4
YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)
A startling narrative of female power not often heard today for some, but as YZ is researching her own history as a descendent from slaves, her portraits reflect a personal impetus to tell these stories with a new force.
She has named this series of strong warriors on the street “Amazone”.
brooklyn-street-art-yz-yseult-senegal-web-2
YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)
Read on via French Street Artist YZ Brings “Amazone” Women to Walls in Senegal.

The ‘disappearing’ Hippopotamus.

Photographer Tim Flach’s latest book Endangered, with text by zoologist Jonathan Baillie, offers a powerful visual record of threatened animals and ecosystems facing the harshest of challenges.
by
Common hippopotamus, Hippopotamus amphibius.
IUCN Red List status: Vulnerable.
In 2003, surveys showed that the number of hippos had dropped by 95% during eight years of civil war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Hippos are hunted for bushmeat but have become the focus of poachers interested in their ivory canines following the 1989 ban on trading elephant ivory.
International trade out of several African countries is restricted, but the law is not yet enforced on the ground.
Today, African elephants outnumber hippos four to one.
Source: Tim Flach’s endangered species – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

Maasai Warriors help Protect Lions.

Maasai warrior Kamunu Saitoti scans the Kenyan rangelands for a signal from a number of lions that have been fitted with radio collars.
Saitoti is part of an organisation called Lion Guardians, a conservation initiative started in 2007 to find ways for the Maasai and lions to coexist.
Scientists estimate that lion populations in Africa have fallen by more than 40% in the past 20 years and the 20,000 or so wild lions that remain occupy just 8% of the species’ historical range.
Image Credit: Photograph by Marcus Westberg/Life Through A Lens.
Source: Travel photo of the week: the warriors helping to protect lions in Kenya | Travel | The Guardian