Cossacks Barracks Russia

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A photo of an old cossacks barracks. These buildings were quite magnificent at time they were built.
After the Russian Revolution the building was used first by the Soviet army and then the Russian army up until 2003.
Now it’s going to be demolished and residential houses are planned to be built in its place.
Source: An Old Abandoned Cossacks Barracks | English Russia

The Chatillon Car Graveyard.

chatillon-car-graveyard-35-640x424Photo by Theo van Vliet.
The Chatillon Car Graveyard is a neatly arrayed collection of vintage cars abandoned in the woods near Chatillon, Belgium.
The cars, originally some 500 in number, were supposedly left there by American soldiers who were stationed in Belgium after World War II.
When the soldiers returned to the United States, they were unable to ship the cars, so they left them neatly parked in the woods.
Over the years the cars have dwindled due to cleanup efforts and scavenging collectors.
The cars are faintly visible on Google Maps.
For more photos see these photo sets by Rosanne de Lange and Stefaan Beernaert.
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photo by Marcel Wiegerinck.
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photo by Marcel Wiegerinck.
See more via The Chatillon Car Graveyard, An Eerie Collection of Vintage Cars Abandoned in a Belgian Forest.

Bhangarh, India’s Haunted City.

Bhangarh ghost city India 2It has lain abandoned for the best part of 400 years and is said to be the most haunted place in India.

Situated between the cities of Delhi and Jaipur in the state of Rajasthan the true reason for its abandonment has been lost to history, though there are several legends surrounding its fate.

Even today no-one is allowed to enter the ghost city of Bhangarh after twilight – it is said that if they do they will never return.

Bhangarh ghost city India 1Image credit Flickr User Saad.Akhtar

Within the grounds there are still majestic temples to major Hindu deities: Shiva, Lavina Devi and Gopinath are represented among others but the throngs of worshipers who clamoured for entrance to the temple are long gone.

The town was first built in the reign of Bhagwant Das, a powerful maharaja, in 1573.

It is said that a local guru was asked for permission to build the city.Bhangarh ghost city India 3

Read further via Bhangarh – India’s Haunted City ~ Kuriositas

The Lady in the Lake, Alaska.

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Contributor: debthomson
The Lady of the Lake is what they call the ghostly remains of a WB-29 Superfortress, a weather reconnaissance aircraft retired in 1955 that sits partially submerged in an Alaskan lake at Eielson AFB.
Once used for open water extrication training until it became too dangerous to serve even that purpose, the Lady of the Lake was once a recon craft that flew over the North Pole.
Stripped of all parts and placed in the lake on the Eielson Air Force Base, she was used for training for several years, interrupted only by the winter weather.
One spring, the water in the lake rose too high to reach her, so there she sits, until someone decides to rescue her, or at least continue to pretend to rescue her, over and over.
Read on via Lady of the Lake | Atlas Obscura.

Village claimed by Nature in China.

houtouwan1janeqingIn the mouth of the Yangtze River off the eastern coast of China, a small island holds a secret haven lost to the forces of time and nature—an abandoned fishing village swallowed by dense layers of ivy slowly creeping over every brick and path.
Houtou Wan Village is located on Gouqi Island, which belongs to a group of 394 islands known as the Shengsi Islands in the Zhoushan Archipelago.
It’s one of many examples of small villages in China that have become ghost towns due to urbanization, inaccessibility, depletion of resources, and shifts in industry, among other factors.
Once a thriving settlement merely half a century ago, Houtou Wan Village was gradually deserted when the small bay could no longer meet the needs of the increasing number of fishing boats.
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Over the past few decades, nature has reclaimed the land, turning the village into a hauntingly beautiful wonderland devoid of human presence save for wandering tourists and a handful of elderly residents who refuse to leave their birthplace.
Above photo credit: Jane Qing
Source: Abandoned Fishing Village in China Reclaimed by Nature – My Modern Met

The Port Arthur Convict Coal Mine.

The_Coal_Mines_is_one_chapter_in_the_epic_story_of_convicts_and_transportation_in_TasmaniaWhen an outcrop of coal was discovered at Plunkett Point by surveyors in 1833, immediate plans were made by the government to exploit the area.
A local supply of coal for the colony was not the only benefit envisaged by Lt. Governor Arthur:
“I think it is not possible that better employ will be found for some of the most refractory convicts than employing them in working coal mines.”
Joseph Lacey, a convict with practical mining knowledge, was sent with a small party of convict labourers to commence the work.
The first shipment of coal left the mine on 5 June 1834 aboard the Kangaroo.
The Plunkett Point mine was the first operational mine in Tasmania. Prior to its establishment most of the colony’s coal requirements had been imported from New South Wales, at great expense.
The coal was used in households and government offices for heating. Poor quality was a cause of constant complaint:
The settlement in 1839
When Lempriere (the Commissariat Officer at Port Arthur) reported on the settlement c. 1839 there were 150 prisoners and a detachment of 29 officers stationed at the mines.
Large stone barracks which housed up to 170 prisoners, as well as the chapel, bakehouse and store had been erected.
fileThe Quarters provided for the Officers assigned to guard the convicts.
Today, they form imposing sandstone ruins. On the hillside above were comfortable quarters for the commanding officer, surgeon and other officials. Remains of some of these can also still be seen.
Carts ran along rail and tram roads to the jetties for loading.
The coal mines settlement was a punishment station for Port Arthur where repeated offenders of ‘the worst class’ were sent.
Besides the men who worked underground extracting the coal, other prisoners were employed in building works, timber getting and general station duties.
Four solitary cells were constructed deep in the underground workings to punish those who committed further crimes at the mines.
Read on via Port Arthur – Coal Mines History.