The Lady in the Lake, Alaska.

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Contributor: debthomson
The Lady of the Lake is what they call the ghostly remains of a WB-29 Superfortress, a weather reconnaissance aircraft retired in 1955 that sits partially submerged in an Alaskan lake at Eielson AFB.
Once used for open water extrication training until it became too dangerous to serve even that purpose, the Lady of the Lake was once a recon craft that flew over the North Pole.
Stripped of all parts and placed in the lake on the Eielson Air Force Base, she was used for training for several years, interrupted only by the winter weather.
One spring, the water in the lake rose too high to reach her, so there she sits, until someone decides to rescue her, or at least continue to pretend to rescue her, over and over.
Read on via Lady of the Lake | Atlas Obscura.

Village claimed by Nature in China.

houtouwan1janeqingIn the mouth of the Yangtze River off the eastern coast of China, a small island holds a secret haven lost to the forces of time and nature—an abandoned fishing village swallowed by dense layers of ivy slowly creeping over every brick and path.
Houtou Wan Village is located on Gouqi Island, which belongs to a group of 394 islands known as the Shengsi Islands in the Zhoushan Archipelago.
It’s one of many examples of small villages in China that have become ghost towns due to urbanization, inaccessibility, depletion of resources, and shifts in industry, among other factors.
Once a thriving settlement merely half a century ago, Houtou Wan Village was gradually deserted when the small bay could no longer meet the needs of the increasing number of fishing boats.
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Over the past few decades, nature has reclaimed the land, turning the village into a hauntingly beautiful wonderland devoid of human presence save for wandering tourists and a handful of elderly residents who refuse to leave their birthplace.
Above photo credit: Jane Qing
Source: Abandoned Fishing Village in China Reclaimed by Nature – My Modern Met

Car Graveyard, Barcaldine.

110060By Aaron Skinn · · From Snapped: My town

Just on the outskirts of my town Barcaldine, Queensland, there is a tree in a paddock with a bunch of dead cars keeping it company.
A solitary monument to times gone by, and a pretty good summary of the landscape around our town.
Unlike the city we have big open skies, and big open paddocks, where there is more open space then there is stuff to fill the gaps.
Barcaldine QLD 4725
Aaron Skinn, Contributor, Barcaldine
via ABC OPEN: Car graveyard || From Project: Snapped: My town.

Ta Prohm Temple, Cambodia.

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Ta Prohm Temple, Cambodia (via Wikimedia)
Cambodia is the closest you can get, today, to your own real life Indiana Jones movie. There, the temples of Angkor seem built into the fabric of the forest itself, bats flap their leathery wings in the vaults, and incense drifts down the empty colonnades.
The god-kings of Angkor were at the height of their powers from the 9th century until the 15th century.
In that time, they built the largest preindustrial city in the world in Cambodia: larger than Rome, larger than Alexandria, larger by far than London or Paris at the time.
Wealth was poured into ever more spectacular temples, replete with intricate carvings and statues.
In the fifteenth century, for reasons which still puzzle scholars today, the gigantic complex was left almost entirely abandoned – lost to the jungle.
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Ta Prohm Temple, Cambodia (via Wikimedia)
Early Western visitors, glimpsing the astonishing structures looming up amidst the trees, were left almost speechless.
For António da Madalena, Angkor was “of such extraordinary construction that it is not possible to describe it with a pen, particularly since it is like no other building in the world.”
Since the 19h century, a slow process of restoration has been taking place. While tourists flock to Angkor today, much of the site remains to be discovered, and the trees loom on all sides, ready to swallow the city up again.
via Essential Guide: Lost Cities | Atlas Obscura.

Ford Thunderbird blanketed by red dust in Texas Panhandle.

A rusting Ford Thunderbird is blanketed by red dust from a supercell thunderstorm in Ralls, Texas.
The dry, plowed fields of the Texas Panhandle made easy prey for the storm, which had winds of more than 90 miles an hour ripping up the topsoil and depositing it farther south.
I was forecasting and positioning a team of videographers and photographers on a storm chase in Tornado Alley—this was our last day of a very successful chase, having witnessed 16 tornadoes over 10 days.
The target area for a storm initiation was just south of Amarillo, Texas. Once the storm became a supercell, it moved southbound, with outflow winds that were easily strong enough to tear up the topsoil and send it into the air.
Image Credit: Photograph by Nicholas Moir / National Geographic Photo Contest
Source: Winners of the 2018 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest – The Atlantic

VW KombieVan lost in Forest.

Image Credit: Photograph by Stefan Bergstrom.
Stefan Bergstrom, a photographer and rural explorer from Sweden, was walking one day when he discovered this long-abandoned VW camper in the clearing of a dense forest.
The derelict vehicle’s once-vibrant blue paint contrasted nicely with the earthy tones of rust and corrosion, helping it stand out amid the sea which was slowly consuming it.
Perhaps not a Volkswagen fanatic’s ideal image, but one that made for an effective photographic subject.
It’s amazing what can be found in the forests of Europe
Source: Nature Overcomes a Derelict VW Camper – Urban Ghosts