The Chatillon Car Graveyard.

chatillon-car-graveyard-35-640x424Photo by Theo van Vliet.
The Chatillon Car Graveyard is a neatly arrayed collection of vintage cars abandoned in the woods near Chatillon, Belgium.
The cars, originally some 500 in number, were supposedly left there by American soldiers who were stationed in Belgium after World War II.
When the soldiers returned to the United States, they were unable to ship the cars, so they left them neatly parked in the woods.
Over the years the cars have dwindled due to cleanup efforts and scavenging collectors.
The cars are faintly visible on Google Maps.
For more photos see these photo sets by Rosanne de Lange and Stefaan Beernaert.
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photo by Marcel Wiegerinck.
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photo by Marcel Wiegerinck.
See more via The Chatillon Car Graveyard, An Eerie Collection of Vintage Cars Abandoned in a Belgian Forest.

Cossacks Barracks.

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A photo of an old cossacks barracks. These buildings were quite magnificent at time they were built.
After the Russian Revolution the building was used first by the Soviet army and then the Russian army up until 2003.
Now it’s going to be demolished and residential houses are planned to be built in its place.
Source: An Old Abandoned Cossacks Barracks | English Russia

Chatterley-Whitfield Colliery, 1863-1977.

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 Chatterley Whitfield Colliery (Image: PentlandPirate).
In a country famous for its landmark industrial ruins, perhaps none are quite so haunting or neglected as Britain’s abandoned mines, collieries and quarries.
Remnants of a lost industrial age, they still dot the landscape of England, Scotland and Wales – reminders of a time when coal was king, and metal ores were mined in vast quantities.
Not only are their ruins strangely elegiac, the stories behind them are often just as melancholy too.
The story of Chatterley Whitfield is one of a once-proud colliery ground down to dust.
Officially opened in 1863, at its height it was producing one million tons of saleable coal a year – the first colliery in the United Kingdom to hit such a staggering number.
As one of the largest mines in the region, it employed thousands; its gigantic chimney becoming a local icon.
Today Chatterley Whitfield stands empty; a strangely-pristine reminder of its bygone glory days.
Closed in 1977 after it was decided the seam could be mined easier from nearby Wolstanton Colliery, it had a brief half-life as a mining museum.
It couldn’t last. By 1993, the place was in ruins.
Abandoned to the elements, it seemed a few short winters away from complete collapse.
via Urban Ghosts10 Abandoned Mines, Quarries and Collieries – Urban Ghosts.

Forgotten Places of Europe by David de Rueda.

The French photographer David de Rueda travels the world in search of unusual places.
He is captivated by the aesthetic beauty of derelict buildings and teamed up with Nikon to create a striking photo project based on abandoned places, in Europe.
Photos by David de Rueda/Nikon/Rex Shutterstock.

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An abandoned ferris wheel in Pripyat, the town that used to house many of the workers at the Chernobyl nuclear plant.
Only 3km from the site of the disaster, Pripyat was evacuated 36 hours after the explosion.

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Abandoned locomotives and carriages in Budapest.
The derelict engine shed is located in the middle of a working train depot
See more images via Abandoned places – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Trees Impale 1937 Chrysler Imperial, Old Car City.

Trees grow through the windshield of a 1937 Chrysler Imperial as it sits at Old Car City, the world’s largest known classic car junkyard, in White, Georgia.
Many of the cars have never moved in over 30 years and in some cases, trees now grow through them, even lifting some off the ground.
Image Credit: Photograph by David Goldman / AP
Source: A Walk in the Woods: A Photo Appreciation of Trees – The Atlantic