Chromatic Wood Type and Borders 1874.

Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type and Borders (1874) Some select pages from the exquisite Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type, Borders, Etc. (1874), a specimen book produced by the William H. Page wood type company. Chromatic types, which were made to print in two or more colours, were first produced as wood type by Edwin Allen, […]

Fish Market Trade Cards.

Although several nice versions of this Prichard & Knoll trade card with novelty fish lettering were produced in the later 19th century, you might say they are now endangered. These two came from the same dealer and recently sold at auction for handsome sums. They are equally nice, however the first card has much finer […]

Raid on the Queensland Government Printing Office.

Following Australia’s entry into the first World War, thousands of Queenslanders enlisted in the military to go and fight in Europe. However, as the war dragged on and it became evident that victory would not be achieved quickly or easily, the initial enthusiasm for the conflict waned and recruitment rates began to decline. The British […]

‘PEEFACE’ and other Typos.

Having worked in the printing industry you do see some very weird things from time to time. In the days of hot metal at least it was some fun. I can remember a bloke who had been at the pub for his dinner break. He went back to work pissed and then decided to throw […]

Havana’s Oldest Printmaking Studio.

Ian Marcos Gutiérrez, a 23-year-old printer at the Taller Experimental de Gráfica, in Havana, helps the author prepare a block of lithographic limestone for printing. (Arien Chang Castán) by Mimi Dwyer; Photographs by Arien Chang Castán Lithography arrived in Cuba before anywhere else in the Americas, as a way to protect the sanctity and integrity […]

The Vandercook Proof Press.

In the early 20th century, printers were still pulling crude proofs from hand presses and simple galley roller presses that depended on gravity for the impression. In 1909, R.O. Vandercook was the first to develop a geared, rigid-bed cylinder proof press, a machine capable of providing the industry with high-quality proofs from metal types and […]

Print in Medieval Paris.

Situated on the River Seine in northern France, late medieval Paris was a great university city and offered printers the opportunity to sell their books to teachers and scholars. In 1436 the French King, Charles VII, reclaimed the city from its occupiers,the Burgundians who were allied to the English, making Paris the capital of France […]

The Neotype, a Soviet copy of the Linotype.

If Neotype is what I think (a Soviet copy of Linotype / Intertype), then it’s still pretty popular in former Eastern Bloc countries. The Book Art Museum in Poland has one (model N114 if I remember correctly) and an operating manual as well. They were made in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg). Peter the Great, who […]

The Peterborough Print Museum.

Most people would know of the magnificent collection of wooden type housed in the Hamilton Wood Type Museum, Two Rivers, Wisconsin in the United States. Also, A lot of Old Guvvers would realise that the Government Printing Office in Adelaide had a terrific collection of priceless wooden type which magically disappeared when it was put […]

A Short History of Postcards.

Postcards are extremely popular to collectors because they portray a lot of subjects, from picturesque landscapes to portraits of famous people. They can even portray various forms of art, architecture and events. Postcards may also be considered as indicators of history, but it all depends on the determining factors that a certain postcard portrays. There […]