Chandler and Price Paper Guillotine.

Chandler Price GuillotineChandler & Price was founded in 1881 in Cleveland, Ohio, by Harrison T. Chandler and William H. Price.
They manufactured machinery for printers including a series of hand-fed platen jobbing presses, as well as an automatic feeder for these presses (the Rice Feeder).
They also made paper cutters (Guillotines) as well as book presses, and assorted equipment.
Despite dominating the industry in the 1930s, by the 1950s the offset printing industry had eclipsed the world of movable type printing, and only Chandler & Price and Brandtjen and Kluge continued to make open platen presses (named Gordon after the original inventor).
Chandler & Price had bought the patent for the Gordon after the inventor’s death. Chandler & Price, the Company ceased production of presses in 1964.
The New Style Press made by Chandler & Price was such a popular press that The Practice Of Printing: Letterpress and Offset by Ralph Polk, the standard textbook for thousands of high school printing programs in the middle of the 20th century, used the press as its example when teaching students the basics of press operation.

Beautiful Vintage Print Ephemera.

Print Ephemera is generally material designed and printed to be useful or important for only a short time, especially pamphlets, notices, tickets and the like
So, it just wouldn’t be right would it, if the print companies didn’t indulge in a bit of advertising of their companies using high grade ephemera
Here’s some great stuff from years gone by…
cadprint
libpress
harrisprint
litho
Via Sheaff: Ephemera

Joseph Moxon, Royal Printer, 1627-1691.

b_1_q_0_p_1

Joseph Moxon (8 August 1627 – February 1691), hydrographer (mapper of oceans)  to Charles II, was an English printer of mathematical books and maps, a maker of globes and mathematical instruments, and mathematical lexicographer.
He produced the first English language dictionary devoted to mathematics.
In November 1678, he became the first tradesman to be elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society.
Between the ages of around 9 and 11, Moxon accompanied his father, James Moxon, to Delft and Rotterdam where he was printing English Bibles.
It was at this time that Moxon learned the basics of printing.
After the First English Civil War the family returned to London and Moxon and his older brother, James, started a printing business which specialized in the publication of Puritan texts, with the notable exception of A Book of Drawing, Limning, Washing or Colouring of Mapps and Prints of 1647 which was produced for Thomas Jenner, a seller of maps.
In 1652, Moxon visited Amsterdam and commissioned the engraving of globe-printing plates, and by the end of the year was selling large celestial and terrestrial globes in a new business venture.
He specialized in the printing of maps and charts, and in the production of globes, and mathematical instruments made of paper.
In January 1662, he was appointed hydrographer to the King, despite his Puritan background.
His shop at this time was on Ludgate Hill ; afterwards, in 1683, it was ‘on the west side of Fleet Ditch,’ but always ‘at the sign of Atlas.’
Moxon’s 1683 book, Mechanick Exercises, provides descriptions of contemporary printing methods that have proved useful for bibliographers.
via Joseph Moxon – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

The Printing Forme for Letterpress Production.

diagram1

The Chase
A rectangular metal frame (usually cast iron) called a chase was the basis of the printing forme for many years. The type was placed on a flat surface called a metal compositor’s stone and locked into position.
This metal frame is used to hold type in place while printing, usually on a platen press or flat bed press.
Type and blocks are locked up towards the centre of the chase using furniture to position it and quoins to apply pressure against the type matter.
Lock up was done on a composing stone to ensure that type was level. Before the quoins are tightened a wood planer is tapped gently on the type surface using a wooden printer’s mallet to confirm the feet are flush against the stone and completely level.
The size of a chase matches a specific press. The measurements, in inches, of the inside of the chase are also used to describe the press size.
Some chases, especially large ones, have handles at the top to assist the printer in both transporting and placing the chase in position on the press.
Chases can also be useful with flatbed presses for a variety of situations. Composition of complex forms can be created on a composing stone in a large chase, then brought to the press before printing.
The photograph above shows the bottom right hand corner of a chase into which type – in this case lines of type (sometimes called slugs) – spaced with various pieces of “furniture” have been locked up..
Furniture was normally wood but sometimes strips of lead, Elrod material, Monotype supercaster material  or cornerstone.
Quoins
Quoins (pronounced “coins”) were used to secure the whole assembly.
Sometimes two wooden wedges were set against each other to tighten the forme and to keep the furniture parallel to the side of the chase.
I had never seen hempel quoins (in the second picture below) until I started at The Guv in 1973. Up until then I had been using Cornerstone (British) Quoins which I considered superior.
In the picture above spring loaded quoins are being used. When a quoin key is turned in the threaded part of the quoin (the circle with the square recess) the two sections spread to apply pressure to the furniture to keep the whole assembly firm and secure.
Turning the quoin key in the opposite direction slackens the pressure off and releases the furniture and type.
quoin_key
Once the type was arranged in its final printing position, the  quoins were tightened up and the forme “planed down”. The whole chase, complete with its contents, was then transferred to the printing press.
In this form the chase and contents were called a “printing forme”.
derwombat

 

The Don Dorrigo Gazette.

The tiny town of Dorrigo on the Mid North Coast of New South Wales is home to Australia’s last letterpress newspaper.
The paper, which has been running since 1906, is now owned and operated by husband and wife team Michael and Jade English. Together, they print 1,000 copies of the paper for the town of just over 1,000 people each week.
Mr English has been working on the paper for nine years, but his father ran it for 50 years before him, so he grew up watching the process.”During my primary school years I used to come here before school and watch,” he said. “It’s been a part of my life ever since I was born, and I don’t know anything different.
“Michael started working on the paper alongside his father after the mill he worked at was closed and he was made redundant. “Six weeks after I was here dad got ill and had to retire, so I was chucked in the deep end.

front_page_of_the_don_dorrigo_gazette_and_guy_fawkes_advocate_8_january_1910

A previous employee named Alan Smith came back to help Mr English learn the process, which Mr English said was more complicated than many people realise.”Once we get a story in, we’ll work out whether it’s relevant for Dorrigo, then we’ll typeset it on the Intertype,” he said.
“Once it’s set, Jade will proof read it, we make any changes then. Once that’s done we get to print it.”
“Sometimes things do get missed, we’re only human,” Mr English said. “Things have improved in the last two months since I got reading glasses.”We set the type in hot metal on the Intertype machine, which will then be laid into the bed of the press and run off”.
He said the staff write very few of their own stories, because their time is taken up with the mechanical part of the process. The intertype machine is almost 60 years old, and the printing press was made over 70 years ago. “That’s the biggest thing, making sure everything’s tip-top,” Mr English said.
The process is not only arduous, it can also be dangerous, with risk of lead poisoning and burns. “You need to know how to operate the machine, you’ve got to concentrate on what you’re setting, and you have to keep in mind what the machine’s doing,” he said.
“When the elevator jams up it could pump lead everywhere. Dad had some pretty bad burns.”

7809486-3x2-940x627

Photo: The type for the newspaper is laid into the bed of the press before printing. (ABC Coffs Coast: Liz Keen)
Read on via The Don Dorrigo Gazette: Australia’s last letterpress newspaper – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Early Printing: Albrecht Pfister in Bamberg.

20070220211718_rathausonthebridge

Bamberg is situated on the River Regnitz before it flows in to the River Main and many of its most important buildings were constructed on top of one of its seven hills.
The town established itself as an important religious centre and many manuscript books were written and illuminated in the religious houses, most notably by the monks of Michaelsberg Abbey.
It is therefore perhaps not surprising that a printing house was established in the city so soon after the exodus of printers from Mainz.
With an educated population, a number of religious houses and a wealthy Bishop as patron, the printer (Albrecht Pfister) had a ready market for the new technology of printing.
Bamberg was also the first place where books in the German language were printed, illustrated by woodcuts.
Fresko_Druckerei_Pfister_Bamberg_1461-Rothbart
via First Impressions | Bamberg.