‘Faceless’ by Diego Bardone.

CaptureIn a world of celebrity injunctions and increasingly strict privacy laws, it can be difficult for street photographers to assert their creativity, argues Diego Bardone.

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Based in Milan, the 52-year-old has been documenting his home city for the past nine years.
For his recent project, “Faceless: An Ode to Privacy Laws”, Bardone built up a series of candid shots of strangers – their identities obscured – making for a poignant yet playful reflection on human identity.

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“Mine is a daily diary,” he says, “a tribute to those often unaware actors whom I have the good fortune to meet during my lonely walks in Milan.”
“It’s like I see myself in a sort of virtual mirror:
I’m every single one of them, they are my wandering cheerfulness becoming photography.”
Diego Bardone.
Source: Faceless: The street photography of Diego Bardone | Photography | Culture | The Independent

Red Winged Blackbird, Virginia.

Red-winged Blackbird.
Photo by Kathrin Swoboda/Audubon Photography Awards
Category: Amateur Species
Location: Huntley Meadows Park, Alexandria, Virginia.
Camera: Nikon D500 with Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VR lens; 1/800 second at f/6.3; ISO 2500
Story Behind the Shot: I visit this park near my home to photograph blackbirds on cold mornings, often aiming to capture the “smoke rings” that form from their breath as they sing out.
On this occasion, I arrived early on a frigid day and heard the cry of the blackbirds all around the boardwalk.
This particular bird was very vociferous, singing long and hard.
I looked to set it against the dark background of the forest, shooting to the east as the sun rose over the trees, backlighting the vapour.
Bird Lore: Red-winged Blackbirds are some of the most abundant and conspicuous birds in North America.
Beginning in early spring, males perch above marshes, pond edges, damp fields, and roadside ditches, flaring their red shoulder patches and belting out arresting songs to announce their claims to breeding territories.
Source: The 2019 Audubon Photography Awards: Winners | Audubon

Indian Kushti Wrestlers live a Spartan existence.

Image Credit: Photograph by © Alain Schroeder. All rights reserved.
Kushti is the traditional form of Indian wrestling.
Practised in Akhara, the wrestlers, under the supervision of a guru, dedicate their bodies and minds to Kushti on average for 6 to 36 months.
It is a way of life and a spartan existence that requires rigorous discipline.
Kushti is also known as pehlwani. The freestyle matches last about half an hour, and a wrestler typically wins by simultaneously pinning an opponent’s shoulders and hips to the ground.
Experienced wrestlers set the example and transmit their skills in the pit and in the community to the younger boys (7-8 years old) and new recruits, whereby promoting camaraderie, solidarity and fraternity.
See more great Images via Kushti | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

Woman and Child, Pibor, South Sudan.

Pibor, South Sudan
A displaced woman looks at her child, who is hiding behind her dress, in a school now occupied by internally displaced people after heavy rains and floods forced hundreds of thousands of people to leave their homes in the town of Pibor.
Photograph: Andreea Câmpeanu/Reuters
Source: 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian