“Abandoned” by Lee.

andy-lee-03Photos of abandoned buildings reclaimed by nature by British photographer Andy Lee.
andy-lee-04
The ongoing series uses infrared and long-exposure which gives the images a dramatic and mystical feel.
andy-lee-14
See more Images via Abandoned: Photos by Andy Lee | Faith is Torment

“Seljalandsfoss Waterfall”.

Seljalandsfoss,_Suðurland,_Islandia,_2014-08-16,_DD_201-203_HDRSunset view from the back of the Seljalandsfoss waterfall, Suðurland, Iceland.
Photograph by Diego Delso.
The Waterfall of the River Seljalandsá in Iceland drops 60 metres (or 200 ft) over the cliffs of the former coastline.
This waterfall is regarded as one of the most enchanting in all of Iceland.
Front Image of the Waterfall is captured from the other side.
Source: File:Seljalandsfoss, Suðurland, Islandia, 2014-08-16, DD 201-203 HDR.JPG – Wikimedia Commons

“Green Tree Frog Works Out”.

8c22d4bf-1590-4499-8f9e-9b43e2044ceb-1020x612A green tree frog manages a chin-up over a slender bamboo cane in a garden in the Indonesian capital.
The frog’s sticky toe pads act like suction cups, enabling it to cling to smooth surfaces and stay clear of predators
via Eyewitness: Jakarta, Indonesia | World news | The Guardian.

“Electrical Therapy”.

14714618191_d7fcb09c86_oA selection of images from High Frequency Electric Currents in Medicine and Dentistry (1910) by champion of electro-therapeutics Samuel Howard Monell, a physician who the American X-Ray Journal cite, rather wonderfully, as having “done more for static electricity than any other living man”.
Although the use of electricity to treat physical ailments could be seen to stretch back to the when the ancient Greeks first used live electric fish to numb the body in pain, it wasn’t until the 18th and 19th centuries – through the work of Luigi Galvani and Guillaume Duchenne – that the idea really took hold.
Monell claims that his high frequency currents of electricity could treat a variety of ailments, including acne, lesions, insomnia, abnormal blood pressure, depression, and hysteria.
Although not explicitly delved into in this volume, the treatment of this latter condition in women was frequently achieved at this time through the use of an early form of the vibrator (to save the physician from the manual effort), through bringing the patient to “hysterical paroxysm” (in other words, an orgasm).
These days electrotherapy has been widely accepted in the field of physical rehabilitation, and also made the news recently in its use to keep soldiers awake (the treatment of fatigue also being one of Monell’s applications).
14737659603_60c217b550_o
Please go to the Website to fully appreciate the other Images via High Frequency Electric Currents in Medicine and Dentistry (1910) | The Public Domain Review.

“Twelve Apostles”.

The_twelve_apostles_Victoria_Australia_2010The Twelve Apostles is a collection of limestone stacks off the shore of the Port Campbell National Park, by the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia.
The apostles were formed by erosion: the harsh and extreme weather conditions from the Southern Ocean gradually eroded the soft limestone to form caves in the cliffs, which then became arches, which in turn collapsed; leaving rock stacks up to 45 metres high.
The site was known as the Sow and Piglets until 1922 (Muttonbird Island, near Loch Ard Gorge, was the Sow, and the smaller rock stacks were the Piglets); after which it was renamed to The Apostles for tourism purposes.
The formation eventually became known as the Twelve Apostles, despite only ever having nine stacks.
via Wikipedia.

“Plugger” the Pilot.

119085

Photographer: Tiff Firth · · From Pic of the Week
I really wanted to capture this shot to picture the last day of winter.
Many thanks to the pilot ‘Plugger’, who made me wobble on my ladder when he zoomed up my driveway for this shot.
This is exactly how I had it visualised.
And don’t worry, that’s smoke he’s blowing out, not chemicals.
Aerotech Australia has the most awesome staff.
This is an Airtractor contract sprayplane and a paddock of our canola on the last day of winter.
Lower Eyre Peninsula. South Australia. Cummins SA 5631
Source: ABC OPEN: Hit The Deck || From Project: Pic of the Week