Car Graveyard, Barcaldine.

110060By Aaron Skinn · · From Snapped: My town

Just on the outskirts of my town Barcaldine, Queensland, there is a tree in a paddock with a bunch of dead cars keeping it company.
A solitary monument to times gone by, and a pretty good summary of the landscape around our town.
Unlike the city we have big open skies, and big open paddocks, where there is more open space then there is stuff to fill the gaps.
Barcaldine QLD 4725
Aaron Skinn, Contributor, Barcaldine
via ABC OPEN: Car graveyard || From Project: Snapped: My town.

High Above the River Uvac in Serbia.

r10Color it Green: Lovely, Curvaceous River Uvac in Serbia.
This light-green beauty is located in Special Nature Reserve Uvac, namely the Uvac Canyon, which is also known for being a habitat of huge Griffon Vultures, which can have a wingspan of almost three meters.
Image via  http://bit.ly/1jBYJXA
The Griffon Vulture is 93–122 cm long with a 2.3–2.8 m wingspan. In the nominate race the males weigh 6.2 to 10.5 kg and females typically weigh 6.5 to 11.3 kg. Hatched naked, it is a typical Old World vulture in appearance, with a very white head, very broad wings and short tail feathers. It has a white neck ruff and yellow bill. The buff body and wing coverts contrast with the dark flight feathers.
Like other vultures, it is a scavenger, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals which it finds by soaring over open areas, often moving in flocks. It establishes nesting colonies in cliffs that are undisturbed by humans while coverage of open areas and availability of dead animals within dozens of kilometers of these cliffs is high. It grunts and hisses at roosts or when feeding on carrion.
The maximum recorded lifespan of the Griffon Vulture is 41.4 years for an individual in captivity. (via Wikipedia)
See more images via Dark Roasted Blend: Super-Colorful Rivers.

The Baobab Tree Lives On.

Capture
“The baobab is the national tree of Madagascar.
Of the nine genera in the Word, six are found only in Madagascar [two are in Arabia and one in Australia].
However due to deforestation, three of these baobab species are endangered and facing a serious threat of extinction,” says photographer Emiline.
“This photo was taken at the famous ‘Avenue des Baobabs’ which is found along a dirt road in the Menabe region of Madagascar, near the city of Morondava.
The trees are thought to be up to 800 years old and remain under threat from slash-and-burn agriculture, encroaching rice paddies, overgrazing and bark collection.
In recent years the Malagasy authorities and some NGOs have taken some conservation measures to protect their precious forests, including this beautiful area in the western Madagascar.”
Photo credit: Emiline
via Saved: Wildlife in Earth’s protected areas.

Something Grimm in Cologne.

o-GRIMM1-900by Candace Kita
Once upon a time, there lived a photographer named Kilian Schönberger – and while he is not a character from your favorite fairy tale, his very real images spin some otherworldly fantasies.
Working in Cologne, Germany, the photographer’s own backyard serves as the source for his “Brothers Grimm’s Homeland” series and captures the woodlands and waterfalls that served as a backdrop for many infamous folktales.
o-GRIMM16-900
Schönberger – who, ironically, is color-blind – perfectly blends the misty, magical, and macabre in his intensely-atmospheric photographs.
Presenting everything from thickets full of brilliant sunlight to copses where things go bump in the night, his landscapes speak to the battles of good, evil, and everything in-between that pervade folklore tradition.
Although his images more often feature gingerbread cottages and ancient castles than human characters, Little Red Riding Hood would look perfectly natural running through them.
o-GRIMM2-900
See more Images via There’s Something Grimm About These Photos.

‘Losing the Fight’ by Aaron Gekoski.

Losing the Fight by Aaron Gekoski (UK)
Orangutans have been used in degrading performances at Safari World, Bangkok, and many other locations for decades.
Such shows were temporarily stopped in 2004 amid international pressure but they have since resumed – taking place twice a day, every day – with hundreds of people paying to watch the the clever animals box, dance, play the drums and more
Image Credit: Photograph: Aaron Gekoski,/2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year
Source: Wildlife photographer of the year: Lumix people’s choice shortlist 2019 – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian