A Short History of Postcards.

wishyouwerehere-675x460Postcards are extremely popular to collectors because they portray a lot of subjects, from picturesque landscapes to portraits of famous people. They can even portray various forms of art, architecture and events.
Postcards may also be considered as indicators of history, but it all depends on the determining factors that a certain postcard portrays.
There are lots of people who appreciate the value of postcards, which is why many of them collect postcards as a hobby.
Postcard collecting is technically known as deltiology, and is now considered one of the popular collectible hobbies.


Theodore Hooke posted the first picture postcard in 1840. It was a hand painted postcard depicting the post office and its workers (see above).
Apparently, it was Theodore Hooke himself who posted it as a practical joke, as it featured caricatures of the postal office workers themselves.
The American postal card was first conceptualised and patented by John P. Charlton in 1861. He eventually sold the rights to Hymen Lipman, who added borders to the postal cards.
These cards though, did not contain images and were known as “Lipman’s Postal Cards”.
A few years later, Leon Besnardeau made another picture postcard version. The postcard, became the first picture postcard in Britain.
It depicts emblematic images on one side of the postcard. However, there is no existing evidence indicating Leon Besnardeau mailed this postcard without an envelope. The postcard contains an inscription reading “War of 1870. Camp Conlie. Souvenir of the National Defence. Army of Brittany”.
A year after Britain’s first picture postcard was created, the first picture postcard that served as a souvenir came from Vienna. The following year, the first advertising card was distributed in Great Britain. In 1874, the first German postcard became available to the public.
In 1873, Morgan Envelope Factory was the first to develop the American postcard. In the same year as well, John Creswell, who was the postmaster during that time, presented the first pre-stamped postcards.
The main function of these postcards was to make a convenient means for people to easily send notes.
Two decades later, the post office created the first postcard souvenir to inform the masses of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. This boosted the sales of the postcards. In 1880s as well, the cards depicting other forms of images became extremely popular. This has led to the “Golden Age” of postcards until the 1890s.
Postcards became popular especially during the early 1900s, when postcard publishing companies printed images of buildings and other structures.
In 1908 alone, there were approximately 700 million postcards mailed. Almost two decades later came the “white border” era. This era featured postcards with white borders around them.


Eventually the “white border” era was replaced by the “linen card” era, which took place in the early 1930s. These linen cards feature a texture similar to linen cloth. This ‘linen card’ trend lasted until the 1950s.
via Overnight Prints

The Child Snake Killer of Bourke.


Hi! My name is Alex Riley the ‘Toff’ and I used to work at the old Government Printing Office in King William Road, and at Netley.
When I was a young lad (with hair) I accidentally killed a bush snake with my stick, out the back of Bourke in New South Wales
I still have the snake at home, unfortunately it’s dead, but it does take pride of place in the pocket of my pants, right next to my moth infected wallet.
And YES! although I am old and senile, I am still very much Alive and filthy rich. Eat your hearts out!
The Toff

A Wet Wedding.

The happy couple planned the Perfect Wedding, at a beautiful beach South of Adelaide.

The weather  forecaster said, ‘No worries, it’s going to be a belter.’

So with hope in their heart and wonderful relatives and friends in tow hey made their way down to the beach.

Everyone was  just so excited for the beautiful couple and then this showed up on the horizon….

Oh! My goodness, A storm was gathering, There was no alternative venue planned. Bugger that weather forecaster.

So what to do?

Were these good people going to let a bit of water spoil the wedding?

No way, and then with classic female fortitude and cleverness they made themselves some quite stylish and practical water hats using the council’s dog poo collection bags (minus the poo of course).

Three Cheers for All, they made it.


Aurora Australis over Victoria,

aurora-australis-dataAn amazing natural display of light has been captured in a series of images taken by a photographer in eastern Victoria.
Caitlin Gordon spotted the pink curtains of light from the Aurora Australis from a farm just outside Traralgon.
“I thought it was actually some light reflecting from nearby power stations at first until I saw it on the camera,” she told ABC Gippsland.
The phenomenon is caused when electrically charged electrons and protons accelerate down the Earth’s magnetic field lines and collide with neutral atoms in the upper atmosphere — usually about 100 kilometres above the Earth, according to the Bureau of Meteorology.
via Aurora Australis: Photographer captures amazing natural lightshow over Victoria – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).