“Reflection”, Iceland.

Reflection by Michael Epel.
Image Credit: Photograph by Michael Epel
Photograph Location: Kopavogur, Capital Region, Country: Iceland.
Camera: Phase One IQ3 60MP
Focal Length: 35 mm
Shutter Speed: 1/2 sec Aperture: f/19ISO: 50
Source: Reflection Photo by Michael Epel — National Geographic Your Shot

El Tepozteco, Mexico.

High up in the mountains of Morelos, a two-hour bus ride from Mexico City, lies an ancient pyramid at the end of a spectacular hike through the Mexican cloud forest.
Dedicated to Tepoztecatl, the Aztec god of Pulque, the shrine attracted pilgrims from as far away as Guatemala in its day.
Today, the pyramid overlooks the quaint mountain town of Tepoztlan, known throughout Mexico for its supposed mysticism, far flung community of European and American expats, and production of Mezcal.
The pyramid has two rooms inside, one opening out onto the monumental stairs and the other a smaller chamber in the interior.
two
Photo: Coatis are raccoon like animals with sharp teeth. Whilst females can be the size of a large house cat, it’s not uncommon for males to grow to twice their size. They are indigenous to the Americas.
The hike from the town up to the archeological site is filled with spectacular waterfalls, dense rainforest canopy, rock formations that would make Dr. Seuss jealous, and playful coatis.
The path leading up to the mountaintop temple tracks along beautiful ancient stairs before devolving into a trail of rough boulders. The final stretch before reaching the pyramid cuts right through a thin rock canyon that frames the edifice.
The gorgeous rainforest hike makes it easy to see why the devoted would travel from other countries just to worship at El Tepozteco.
Edited by: EricGrundhauser (Admin)
via El Tepozteco | Atlas Obscura.

“Oh, Dear My Thanksgiving Dinner.”

blog-oh-dear-my-thanksgivin
Detail: “Oh, Dear, My Thanksgiving Dinner!” c. 1907 by Jeanette Bernard:
Jeanette Bernard: American photographer, born in Germany: (1855-1941)
A gelatin silver print from original glass plate negative acquired by Culver Service : 15.6 x 20.0 cm:
from PhotoSeed Archive
Source: Oh, Dear, My Thanksgiving Dinner! | PhotoSeed

The Slang used at Government Print.

language“wacka” A juicy rumour so important that an instant crowd of workers would gather on hearing the wacka alert whistle. No good ever came out of spreading a “wacka.”
“Like blowflies around a lump of shit” The Dago’s masterly description of a “wacka” crowd gathering and hovering around like eager to hear the latest gossip.
“Clicker” An archaic term used to describe a Leading Hand in the printing trade.
“The Long Weight” A joke played on an unsuspecting new apprentice who was sent off for a long weight. They would be left waiting for bloody ages, until the penny dropped. “Meggsy” Grunert fell for it ten times in a row.
“The Old Guv at KWR” Meaning the Old Government Printing Office in King William Road, Adelaide. It was knocked down by the Government in 1974. One hundred years of history down the drain for a bloody car park. A disgrace!
“The Netley Complex” The new Government Printing Office on Marion Road. Opened in 1974 through to the mid 1990s. Famous as the Home of the largest parquet dance floor in the Southern Hemisphere.
“Things will get better when we get to Monarto” Saying coined by Brian “Grubby” Hartshorne. Monarto was a bush area miles from Adelaide where half the population of Adelaide were to be relocated. It never happened.
“Artful Dodger” one of the young villans from Dickens “Oliver Twist,” also used by the “Flash” Woolman to describe a compulsive sickie taker, a work bludger and compo bludger.
“The Fish” Metal bar with a hook eye on the end, it was made of lead, tin and antimony and was fed by a chain into the Intertype typesetting machine’s casting pot. Apart from casting lines of type “The Fish’ were made into the most amazing range of fishing sinkers on the planet. This was illegal of course.
“The Minda Bus” a totally cruel term for anyone born in Adelaide and used to describe the Special Bus from the Adelaide Railway Station to Marion Road where the Old Guv day shift workers could be seen staggering and lurching their way down the steps of the bus.
“The Wayzgoose” Printers’ Picnic where the members of the Old Guv Chapel would travel to a picnic spot or hotel usually miles from Adelaide. Originally for men and boys the ladies and girls became part of the Wayzgoose program in the 1920s. Dinner, speeches, running races and novelty events were the order of the day.
“The Phantom Shitter” This man had the ability to block a loo with ONE continuous loop of poo. A long piece of printing wooden furniture was needed to break up the loop to enable it to be flushed away.
“The Rocket Room” Home of a monstrous vacuum driven delivery system which had a giant clear plastic rocket used to carry Hansard galley proofs across the ceilings of the Netley Complex. You could hear them rattling along a mile away just like the doodle bugs in the London blitz. Our older English comps scattered each time they heard one going over.
“The Log Cabin” A wooden add-on built between the comp room and machine room in the late 1970s. Generally populated with arse crawlers, “yes” men, bullshit artists and no hopers. It was where most of the Bosses were located.
“A Flash in the Pan” Infamous quote from the late 1960s by Brian “Jumbo” James, Govt. Printer and Frank Johnson, Printing Overseer and used by them to describe what they thought of the future of Offset Printing.
“Clang Out” When an old Comp retired his workmates would gather by their work stones and grab any metal object especially type galleys and small chases and proceed to belt the shit out of them creating an avalanche of noise to send our retiring comrade off in a respectful manner. With the advent of cold type technology the “clang outs” became a thing of the past.
“Follow copy out the window” Expression used to describe a comp setting exactly what’s in the copy even when he suspects it is incorrect. Playing it safe!
“Foreignee, buckey, foreign order” Job done done under the lap or under the counter using the company’s paper, ink and materials. Illegal of course, but endemic in the printing trade.
“It wouldn’t happen in Hot Metal” A painful and sad lament offered up by hot metal comps whenever the computer typesetter stuffed up. Eventually, this expression fell by the wayside as the new technology got better and more reliable

Rod Parham

 

Dreams of Distant Shores.

cannon-beach-at-sunrise-2-1-1-by-shawn-mcclure
Photograph by Shawn McClure
Dreams Of Distant Shores — Cannon Beach, Oregon.
“One will never reach distant shores, if he chooses to remain upon the dock, In fear his little ship of dreams may be dashed against the rocks.”
Fethullah Gulen Looking north from Cannon Beach along the northwest Oregon coastline at dawn.

Chillagoe-Mungana Caves.

Photograph by Drew Hopper
A limestone karst in Chillagoe-Mungana Caves National Park, Queensland.
Karst topography is a landscape formed from the dissolution of soluble rocks such as limestone, dolomite, and gypsum.
It is characterized by underground drainage systems with sinkholes and caves.
It has also been documented for weathering-resistant rocks, such as quartzite, given the right conditions. Subterranean drainage may limit surface water with few to no rivers or lakes.
However, in regions where the dissolved bedrock is covered (perhaps by debris) or confined by one or more superimposed non-soluble rock strata, distinctive karst surface developments might be totally missing.
Source: WALLPAPER: Illuminated limestone – Australian Geographic