Luncheon Report.

Our Legends Luncheon on Friday was an amazing success.

Here are the people who made it a great day:
Trevor Roberts and the wonderful Barbara Roberts, Big Den Grover, Mister and Missus Kevin Stack (hyphenated) Neale, Bob Downs (ankissmyass), Ellen Krueger, Madam Marianne Hunn, The Flacks, Helen and Jack (Globetrotters), Tony Fitzsimmons, Ian (handbinder and sportsman) Pedler, Geoffrey (Giraffe) Michell, Karl ‘Charlie’ Korff,and Ruth, David and Thelma Korff, ‘Happy’ Ray Belt, Alex ‘Toff’ Riley, Rod ‘Honky Tonk’ Parham, Rob and Wendy Powell, Victor Potticary, Conrad and Norma Rogers, Eunice Wright,  Keith (Oko) Oxley, Michael (Undertaker) Burnett, Marilyn and David Harding, Brian ‘Grubby’ Hartshorne. Who did I miss?
Special Thoughts went out to Jyll Watson, Ian Grunert and the others of us who are not feeling too well at this time.

HAVE A HAPPY AND SAFE CHRISTMAS  

from the Old Guv Legends

Tashirojima, ‘Cat Island’.

On the island of Tashirojima, the cats outnumber people, and the people like it that way and it’s no accident.

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The cats n Tashirojima, or what has become known as “Cat Island,” in Japan have come to be the island’s primary residents. Cats have long been thought by the locals to represent luck and good fortune, and doubly so if you feed and care for them.

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Thus, the cats are treated like kings, and although most are feral because keeping them as “pets” is generally considered inappropriate, they are well-fed and well-cared-for.
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Despite this, luck and fortune hasn’t exactly come to the human residents of “Cat Island.” In the last 50 years, the human population of the island has dwindled from 1,000 to fewer than 100.
As more and more people have shunned the island as it became dominated by felines, the people that have remained have become ever more protective of the cats.
Currently, dogs are not allowed on the island to protect the well-being of the cats – and presumably any dog foolish enough to venture onto an island full of feral cats.

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The cats may end up bringing luck after all, however. Tourism has been picking up as the island has become an attraction for curious travelers, thanks to all of those cats.
via Tashirojima – Cat Island | Atlas Obscura.

The Manchester Guardian, 1821.

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An advert for the Guardian’s centenary issue in 1921 Guardian
The Manchester Guardian was founded by John Edward Taylor in 1821, and was first published on May 5 of that year.
The paper’s intention was the promotion of the liberal interest in the aftermath of the Peterloo Massacre and the growing campaign to repeal the Corn Laws that flourished in Manchester during this period.
The Guardian was published weekly until 1836 when it was published on Wednesday and Saturday becoming a daily in 1855, when the abolition of Stamp Duty on newspapers permitted a subsequent reduction in cover price (to 2d) allowed the paper to be published daily.

The Guardian achieved national and international recognition under the editorship of CP Scott, who held the post for 57 years from 1872.
Scott bought the paper in 1907 following the death of Taylor’s son, and pledged that the principles laid down in the founder’s will would be upheld by retaining the independence of the newspaper.
CP Scott outlined those principals in a much-quoted article written to celebrate the centenary of the paper: “Comment is free, but facts are sacred… The voice of opponents no less than that of friends has a right to be heard.”
After retiring from an active role in managing and editing the paper, Scott passed control to his two sons, John Russell Scott as manager and Edward Taylor Scott as editor.
Realising that the future independence of the paper would be jeopardised in the event of the death of one or the other, the two sons made an agreement that in the event of either’s death, one would buy the other’s share.
CP Scott died in 1932 and was followed only four months later by Edward, so sole ownership fell to JR Scott.
Faced with the potential of crippling death duties and the predatory interest of competitors, Scott contemplated a radical move to ensure the future of both the Guardian and the highly profitable Manchester Evening News.
He concluded that the only solution was to give away his inheritance, a far-reaching solution which provoked close advisor (and future Lord Chancellor) Gavin Simonds to conclude: “you are trying to do something which is very repugnant to the law of England. You are trying to divest yourself of a property right”.
Continue on Reading via History of the Guardian | GNM archive | The Guardian.

Peterloo, the bloody clash that changed Britain, 1819.

The Peterloo Massacre published by Richard Carlile in 1819. Photograph: Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives
On the morning of 16 August 1819, an immense crowd poured into Manchester, perhaps the largest the town had ever seen.
They came in an orderly and peaceful fashion. Banners bearing slogans such as “Liberty and Fraternity” and “Taxation without Representation is Unjust and Tyrannical” flapped in the breeze, and bands played patriotic tunes including Rule Britannia and God Save the King. It was a fine and sunny day.
On they came in cheerful mood; organised contingents from Bolton and Bury; 6,000 marching from Rochdale and Middleton; others from Saddleworth and Stalybridge; 200 women dressed in white from Oldham, together with families bringing their children and picnics with them.
If later estimates that 60,000 people gathered at St Peter’s Fields that day are correct, it means that practically half the population of Manchester and the surrounding towns (a crowd somewhat larger than that at Manchester City home matches today) had come to attend a meeting calling for parliamentary reform.
Having the vote mattered, they believed; it would change everything and force politicians to listen to their views and needs – and respond.
A young businessman, 25-year-old John Benjamin Smith, was watching with his aunt from a window overlooking the open space on the edge of the town near St Peter’s Church.
He later wrote: “There were crowds of people in all directions, full of good humour, laughing and shouting and making fun … It seemed to be a gala day with the country people who were mostly dressed in their best and brought with them their wives, and when I saw boys and girls taking their father’s hand in the procession, I observed to my aunt: ‘These are the guarantees of their peaceable intentions – we need have no fears.’”
The people were expecting speeches and a good day out. What they were not anticipating was violence, carried out by troops sent in to disperse them, so aggressively that 18 people would be killed and more than 650 injured in the bloodiest political clash in British history.

The Massacre of Peterloo! or a Specimen of English Liberty by JL Marks. Photograph: The Art Archive/Rex/Shutterstock
What happened at St Peter’s Fields would become known as the Peterloo Massacre – a name coined by a local journalist named James Wroe in punning reference to the Battle of Waterloo four years earlier.
Wroe paid for the joke by seeing his radical newspaper, the Manchester Observer, closed down, and was himself sentenced to a year’s imprisonment for seditious libel.
Read on via Source: The bloody clash that changed Britain | News | The Guardian

Car Culture in the 1920s-1930s.

Pictured: A Washington DC filling station in 1924. I get the feeling that a number of the onlookers were invited along for the photograph.
Image Credit: Shorpy.

Pictured: A Car Crash in Washington DC, circa 1921.

Pictured: A wonderful photograph of life around a country store and filling station in Gordonton, North Carolina, circa 1939.
Image Credit: Shorpy