OGL Luncheon, Friday, 16 August.

You are invited to our next OGL Luncheon

to be held on Friday, 16 August, 2019, commencing 12 Noon

at the West Adelaide Football Club.

An Old Guv Legends Presentation will be made to the most worthy Mr Trevor Roberts.

An Update on next year’s Big Bash Function will be provided.

Attending So far: Dennis Grover, Rod Parham, Kevin and Judy Stack-Neale, Alex Riley, Barbara and Trevor Roberts, Dave and Marilyn Harding, Garry and Jenny Easther,

Apologies: Jude Marks, Barry O’Donnell

For bookings contact Alex Riley on 0419 035 970 or Rod Parham on 0424 294 450.

Monument Valley, Navajo Nation Reservation.

Monument Valley sits on the Utah-Arizona border, within the Navajo Nation reservation.
The iconic sandstone buttes that dot the valley floor can mostly be accessed or viewed from Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, which—though instantly recognizable—has many fewer visitors annually than the nearby Grand Canyon.

Gathered here, a collection of images of some of the many moods of the valley, from wild storms to dusky evenings to bright, sunlit panoramas.
First Image: Monument Valley, as viewed from Hunts Mesa, near the Utah-Arizona border. Photograph by Chan Srithaweeporn / Getty
Second Image: Sunset under a dramatic sky in Monument Valley, as seen from Arizona. Photograph by Dean Fikar / Getty
See more Images via Source: Monument Valley in Photos – The Atlantic

Wooden Type, never out of Fashion.

8325515017_830100991b_bContent Courtesy of Professor David Shields of the Rob Roy Kelly Collection, University of Texas Austin.
Wood has been used for letterforms and illustrations dating back to the first known Chinese wood block print from 868 CE.
The forerunner of the block print in China was the wooden stamp.
The image on these stamps was most often that of the Buddha, and was quite small. Provided with handles to facilitate their use, they were not unlike the modern rubber-stamps of today.
In Europe, large letters used in printing were carved out of wood because large metal type had a tendency to develop uneven surfaces, or crack, as it cooled.
In America, with the expansion of the commercial printing industry in the first years of the 19th century, it was inevitable that someone would perfect a process for cheaply producing the large letters so in demand for broadsides.
Wood was the logical material because of its lightness, availability, and known printing qualities.

Mass Production
Darius Wells of New York invented the means for mass producing letters in 1827, and published the first known wood type catalog in 1828. In the preface to his first wood type catalog, Wells outlined the advantages of wood type.
Wood type was half the cost of metal type, and when prepared by machine it had smooth, even surfaces, where the possibility of unequal cooling caused large lead type to distort.
Up until that time, the usual procedure was to draw the letter on wood, or paper which was pasted to the wood, and then cut around the letter with a knife or graver, gouging out the parts to be left blank.
Wells, however, introduced a basic invention, the lateral router, that allowed for greater control when cutting type and decreased the time it took to cut each letter.
In 1834, William Leavenworth made his contribution to the wood type industry with the introduction of the pantograph to the manufacturing process.
He adapted the pantograph to the Wells router, and the combination formed the basic machinery required for making wood type on a production basis.
via What Is Wood Type? – Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum.

Party Girls. Who? When and Where?

Photograph: Jude Marks
It’s not often that you get a group photograph of so many attractive women from the Old Guv.
The one problem I have got with this photo that there are possibly only a couple of women I can recognise.
It looks suspiciously like a Christmas get-together.
So the questions here would be Who, When and Where?
Can anyone out there help a miserable sod called Rod?
So far I think we have got Standing: Unknown, Jean Newman (top row second from left), Ann Heilman (on the right side of Jean), then Janet McGuiness (nee Bierton) and then three Unknown ladies.
Seated: Unknown, Barbara Bobridge (nee Currie) second from left, Rose LeCornu(?), grumpy Jude Marks in the middle, Unknown, and then Jo Burnett.
Rod Parham

Chandler and Price Paper Guillotine.

Chandler Price GuillotineChandler & Price was founded in 1881 in Cleveland, Ohio, by Harrison T. Chandler and William H. Price.
They manufactured machinery for printers including a series of hand-fed platen jobbing presses, as well as an automatic feeder for these presses (the Rice Feeder).
They also made paper cutters (Guillotines) as well as book presses, and assorted equipment.
Despite dominating the industry in the 1930s, by the 1950s the offset printing industry had eclipsed the world of movable type printing, and only Chandler & Price and Brandtjen and Kluge continued to make open platen presses (named Gordon after the original inventor).
Chandler & Price had bought the patent for the Gordon after the inventor’s death. Chandler & Price, the Company ceased production of presses in 1964.
The New Style Press made by Chandler & Price was such a popular press that The Practice Of Printing: Letterpress and Offset by Ralph Polk, the standard textbook for thousands of high school printing programs in the middle of the 20th century, used the press as its example when teaching students the basics of press operation.