2020 Big Bash – Update.

In 1895 the Old Guv men and boys went to Mount Barker by cart for their annual wayzgoose.
Our 2020 Big Bash could well be our Last. We need young blood to continue the tradition.
It will be held on Wednesday, 1st April at the Buckingham Arms Hotel, Walkerville – 12 noon.
The Cost: $35 per head – Pensioners $29 per head.
ATTENDING (96): Dennis and Jeanna Grover, Kevin and Judy Stack-Neale, Jack and Helen Flack, Rob and Wendy Powell, Dave and Marilyn Harding, Tony Harris, Rod Parham (GW), Alex Riley, Gary and Jenny Easther, Jude Marks, Kevin Stone, Kym Frost, Barbara and Trevor Roberts, Meg and Trevor Smart, Ian and Margaret Pedler, Claire and Darryl Stone, Ian and Yvonne Russell, Bob Downs, Helen Dobie and David Matthews, Rex Blundell, Barry and Denise O’Donnell, Mike and Gail Pearson, Ray Belt (GW), Mike Fuss, Vic Potticary, Allan Orrock, Rod Lawn, Wendy Dowsett, Julie Benkis, Ian Ingham, Gary Mullighan, Ann and Keith Heilman, Dion and Rhonda Williams, Wayne and Angela Brown, Peter Meghery, Faye Oconnell, Jo Burnett, Janet and Steve McGuiness, Sue Marks, Dean (Gomer) Smith, Steve Bodzioch, Mike Burnett, Kym Curgenven, Mark (Killer) Cullen, Barry Bryant, Simon Joy, Louise Farrington, Colleen and Peter Farrow, Marianne Hunn, Steve Palmer, Chris Wallace, Julie Cunningham, Dennis and Judy Duthie, Geoff Michell,  Kym Morrison, Peter Plowman, Leigh McCormack, Helen Dew, Kaarel and Karen Lume, Greg Small, Keith Oxley, Conrad and Norma Rogers, Tony and Elaine Fitzsimmons, Charmaine and Garry Ely, Darryl and Brenton Preece, Ian Grunert, Graham Mutrie, Doug Riggs, Hans Roling, Jeannie Johnstone, Don Woolman,
To be Confirmed: Allan Orrock, Rod Lawn, Ian Ingham, Steve Bodzioch,
Apologies: Garth Mugford, Eunice Wright, Bruce Lockier, Ellen Krueger,
For Bookings Contact Jenny on 0408 898 702, Jude on 0412 822 776, Rod on 0424 294 450 or Alex on 0419 035 970.

1928: The Birth of Sliced Bread, Missouri.

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Sliced bread and its inventor, Otto Rohwedder, have both celebrated a birthday. Rohwedder was born on July 7, 1880, and the first sliced loaves were sold on July 7, 1928.
Every invention that makes life easier is now deemed “the greatest thing since sliced bread,” (or if you live in Australia, ‘the greatest thing since canned piss’) but the idea of presliced bread actually took a while to catch on.
Rohwedder spent over 10 years trying to get a bakery to try out his machine. Bakers thought that their customers simply wouldn’t be impressed and wouldn’t care if their bread was presliced or not.
Skeptics were also worried that the presliced bread would become stale faster or would crumble and fall apart during the slicing, according to the Constitution-Tribune.
However, once Rohwedder got his foot in the door, it didn’t take long for the invention to catch on.
The small town of Chillicothe in northwest Missouri became the first place where sliced loaves were sold to the public. The news even made the front page of the local paper.
mural13_bPhoto: Chillocothe, Missouri.
While there’s no proof, it’s likely that the phrase, “the greatest thing since sliced bread,” came from the advertisement that ran on the back page of the paper, which called the sliced loaves “the greatest forward step in the baking industry since bread was wrapped.”
Just two years after it was introduced, use of the slicing machine spread across the country, and the company Wonder Bread began building its own bread slicers and mass-producing the presliced loaves.
During World War II, the government banned sliced bread in order to put more resources into weapons production rather than bread-slicing-machine production.
The ban only lasted two months because of the strong backlash, not just from bread companies, but also from consumers who had grown used to the presliced bread and were outraged at the idea of having to slice it themselves, according to the Kansas City Star.
Rohwedder’s original machine includes multiple steel blades that chop the loaves into slices just under 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) wide and then stuffs them into a heavy waxed paper wrapping.
Read on via Sliced Bread: The ‘Greatest Thing’ Turns 86.

The Remarkable Dragonfly.

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The sight of a dragonfly is one of the more remarkable that nature has to offer.
The Ark In Space, with the help of some astounding macrophotography, takes a look at the life cycle of the dragonfly as well as its remarkable and unusual physiology.
Image Credit: Photograph by MrClean1982
via Dragonfly Delight – Amazing Macrophotography ~ Kuriositas.

What does the term ‘As thick as thieves’ mean?

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We might expect ‘as thick as thieves’ to be a variant of the other commonly used ‘thick’ simile ‘as thick as two short planks’. The fact that the former expression originated as ‘as thick as two thieves’ gives more weight to that expectation.
As you may have guessed from that lead in, the two phrases are entirely unconnected. The short planks are thick in the ‘stupid’ sense of the word, whereas thieves aren’t especially stupid but are conspiratorial and that’s the meaning of ‘ thick’ in ‘as thick as thieves’.
‘Thick’ was first used to mean ‘closely allied with’ in the 18th century, as in this example from Richard Twining’s memoir Selected Papers of the Twining Family, 1781:
Mr. Pacchicrotti was at Spa. He and I were quite ‘thick.’ We rode together frequently. He drank tea with me.
Like all ‘as X as Y’ similes, ‘as thick as thieves’ depends on Y (thieves) being thought of as archetypally X (thick). The thieves had some competition. Earlier versions were ‘as thick as’… ‘inkle weavers’, ‘peas in a shell’ and ‘three in a bed’, all of which were examples of things that were especially intimate (inkle-weavers sat at looms that were close together).
These variants have now pretty much disappeared, leaving the way clear for ‘as thick as thieves’.
The association of thieves with conspiratorial and secretive language was well established in England in the 18th century. Many of those on the fringes of society, for example poachers, homosexuals, street hawkers and thieves, used secret words and phrases to converse furtively amongst themselves.
Backslang was one example of this, the best known survival of backslang being ‘yob’ for ‘boy’. Several lexicographers had published dictionaries used by those on the wrong side of the law, notably the New Dictionary of the Terms Ancient and Modern of the Canting Crew, 1698.
The ‘canting crew’ were the various vagabonds and coney-catchers (conmen) that inhabited the streets of British cities. The dictionary explained how to decipher the language of “the tribes of gypsies, beggars, thieves, cheats etc.”, so that people could “secure their money and preserve their lives”.
Given that thieves were established as being ‘thick’ by the late 17th century it is surprising that ‘as thick as thieves’ didn’t emerge until a century or so later. The records of the Old Bailey, which list transcripts of cases held there since 1674 and which might be just the place to find this phrase, don’t list it until 1874.
The first example that I can find of it in print is from the English newspaper The Morning Chronicle, in a letter dated March 1827, published in February 1828:
Bill Morris and me are as thick as two thieves.
So there you have it; proverbially at least, planks are stupid but thieves (unless you include bankers) aren’t.
via Phrase Finder.

The Book of Hours, c.1500s.

A selection of wonderful little illustrations found in a  Fifteenth Century Book of Hours attributed to an artist of the Ghent-Bruges school and dating from the late 15th century.
In the pages without full borders the margins have been decorated with an array of different images depicting flowers, birds, jewellery, animals, household utensils and these superb rainbow-coloured ‘grotesques’.
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See more images via Rainbow coloured beasts from 15th century Book of Hours | The Public Domain Review.

Exploring Lord Howe Island.

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The view over Lord Howe Island from the cliffline of Mt Midgford. Image Credit: Courtesy Pinetrees Lodge.
The hike up Lord Howe Island’s Mt Gower is not for the faint hearted.
Widely regarded as one of Australia’s toughest but most spectacular day walks, its 875m summit can only be undertaken with a licensed guide (mostly due to the sensitive wildlife).
The return journey takes between eight and 10 hours through a lot of unmarked track, with some sections so steep that ropes have been fixed to help you climb up.
However, all the hard work will most certainly pay off when you reach the top, with stunning views of the island.
CaptureSome of the flora and fauna of Mt Gower cannot be seen anywhere else in the world; if you’re lucky, you might even see a Lord Howe Island woodhen, an endemic bird brought back from the brink of extinction in recent decades.
And an unusual wildlife experience awaits you at the top – the providence petrels almost fall from the sky to your very feet if you make lots of sound. 
via Lapping up Lord Howe: top things to do – Australian Geographic.