Vale Mort McFeeters.

Sadly, we report the passing of Mort McFeeters (who was the Binding Overseer at Netley) who died midday on Thursday, 7 November, 2019. Aged 81 years.
Mort had been quite ill for a long period of time.
He was born on 22 December, 1937 and commenced an apprenticeship to hand and machine binding at the Government Printing Office on 18 February, 1952.
It soon became apparent that young Mort had a real aptitude for things mechanical. Over a period of time he became a master of machine binding.
Mort retired on 21 October, 1991 after serving the Government Printing Office loyally for almost 40 years.
Tragically, Mort’s wife Connie passed away in August, 2013, leaving Mort and his daughter Jeanette devastated.
May He Rest in Peace. 

A PRIVATE FAMILY Funeral Service will be held to Remember the Life of Morton McFeeters.

OGL Luncheon, Fri. 15 November, 2019.

You and Your partner are invited to our End of Year Luncheon

to be held on Friday, 15 November, 2019, commencing 12 noon

at the West Adelaide Football Club, 57 Milner Road, Richmond

There will be an Update on our Big Bash 2020 Function (1st April, 2020).

Attending: Rod Parham, Alex Riley, Brian Hartshorne, Kevin and Judy Stack-Neale, Alan Orrock, Jude Marks, Rod Lawn, Faye Mconnell, Garth Mugford, Gus Wood, Dennis Grover, Dennis Duthie, Ken Shevlin, Kaarel Lume and partner, Jack and Helen Flack, Ann and Keith Heilman, Ellen Krueger, Geoff Michell, Marianne Hunn, Eunice Wright, Ray Belt (GW), Ian and Margaret Pedler, Wayne Brown, Peter Megyery, Tony and Elaine Fitzsimmons, Vic Potticary, Peter Plowman,
Apologies: Trevor and Barbara Roberts, Jenny and Gary Easther, David and Marilyn Harding, David and Thelma Korff, Mike Burnett, Keith Oxley, Don Woolman, Con and Norma Rogers, Rob and Wendy Powell, Jude Marks,
To book for the November Luncheon contact Alex Riley on 0419 035 970 or Rod Parham on 0424 294 450.

Chromatic Wood Type and Borders 1874.

Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type and Borders (1874)
Some select pages from the exquisite Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type, Borders, Etc. (1874), a specimen book produced by the William H. Page wood type company.
Chromatic types, which were made to print in two or more colours, were first produced as wood type by Edwin Allen, and shown by George Nesbitt in his 1841 Fourth Specimen of Machinery Cut Wood Type.
It is William H Page’s book, however, that is considered to be the highpoint of chromatic wood type production.
As well as providing over 100 pages of brilliantly coloured type, the book can also be seen, at times, to act as some sort of accidental experimental poetry volume, with such strange snippets as “Geographical excursion knives home” and “Numerous stolen mind” adorning its pages.
One wonders whether the decisions about what words to feature and in what order were entirely arbitrary.
Thanks to the wonderful Bibliodyssey blog where we came across the book: visit the post there for more info on the book and a great list of related links.

Source: Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type and Borders (1874) – The Public Domain Review

‘Faceless’ by Diego Bardone.

CaptureIn a world of celebrity injunctions and increasingly strict privacy laws, it can be difficult for street photographers to assert their creativity, argues Diego Bardone.

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Based in Milan, the 52-year-old has been documenting his home city for the past nine years.
For his recent project, “Faceless: An Ode to Privacy Laws”, Bardone built up a series of candid shots of strangers – their identities obscured – making for a poignant yet playful reflection on human identity.

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“Mine is a daily diary,” he says, “a tribute to those often unaware actors whom I have the good fortune to meet during my lonely walks in Milan.”
“It’s like I see myself in a sort of virtual mirror:
I’m every single one of them, they are my wandering cheerfulness becoming photography.”
Diego Bardone.
Source: Faceless: The street photography of Diego Bardone | Photography | Culture | The Independent

Dame Talkative’s Old Sayings, c.1842

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Dame Talkative’s Old Sayings,  for the amusement of young people; 1824?; E. Wallis, London.
A book of wonderfully illustrated rhymes which, although they appear to be for children, often veer into the world of more adult themes.
As well as a few thefts, at one point a boy threatens to beat a snail “as black as a coal”, a lady-bird’s children are said to be possibly dying in a house-fire, and Margery Daw is called a “nasty slut”.
The book seems to have been first published in 1818, with this being a later edition (a pencilled note on the inside pages indicating a date of 1824).
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[Source] Housed at: Internet Archive | From: California Digital Library
[Rights] Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights
[Rights] Download: PDF
Download Links and Options Available via Dame Talkative’s Old Sayings (ca.1824) | The Public Domain Review.

The Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker.

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A juvenile yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) pecks at a ginkgo tree at BBG. Photo by Steven Severinghaus.
by Joe Giunta.
What do the wolf, the beaver, and the yellow-bellied sapsucker have in common? Each is a keystone species, that is, a species that by its actions may affect a whole community. In many cases, other species greatly depend upon their actions for food, shelter, and habitat.
As a predator, the wolf keeps certain animal populations, like deer, from becoming overabundant and destructive to the surrounding habitat. The beaver creates habitat for songbirds, ducks, and muskrats by building dams.
The yellow-bellied sapsucker provides not only habitat but also food for other species.
This medium-sized woodpecker is what’s known as a primary cavity-nesting bird. It makes—by drilling into a somewhat decayed tree—a cavity where it can build a nest and raise young.
The next year, secondary cavity-nesting birds like swallows, chickadees, and bluebirds can then move in to nest there and raise their own young.
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The yellow-bellied sapsucker is also a great provider of food. It drills many “wells” in living trees that bleed throughout the year. The sap attracts insects, and the sapsucker feeds on those as well as the sap itself.
Other small birds like warblers and hummingbirds, as well as butterflies and bats, also come to these sap wells to feed.
Sapsucker wells have been found in over a hundred species of trees, but the sapsucker seems to prefer trees that bleed more than others, such as red maple and birch.
Read further via Birds of Brooklyn: Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker – Brooklyn Botanic Garden.