The Lagonda Platen, 1947.

Lagonda Platen 1947
The Lagonda has attrac­ted a lot of atten­tion — it’s one of those machines that few people have seen and had attained an almost myth­ical status.
The machine was installed in the 1950s, while Gary Arber was in the Royal Air Force, but it was never very pop­u­lar.
The feed mech­an­ism is driven by a long, single bar run­ning from left to right and it was very difficult to operate.
The Brit­ish Printer write-up of the Lagonda sug­ges­ted they could be run side-by-side, but the way the motor hous­ing is posi­tioned leads me to believe that this could never have been done in practice.
Arber-Printing-Works-126x300
Gary Arber’s Letterpress Print Shop.
The visitor’s first impres­sion is the wealth of objects — every­where.
Each sur­face is filled with enga­ging and inter­est­ing things.
Sta­tion­ery, eph­em­era, odds-and-sods from the print works itself.
This ground floor is Gary Arber’s shop win­dow and the place to deal with cus­tom­ers.
NOTE: The machinery from Gary Arber’s shop is now held as a collection at Catseye Press UK.
via Blog | British Letterpress | A UK-centric view of letterpress printing.

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