H.P. Lovecraft, an early master of Horror, 1890-1937.

H.P. Lovecraft in 1934 – Image Credit: Wikimedia.
Howard Phillips Lovecraft was born in Rhode Island.
He was an only child, and when he was three years old his father was committed to a psychiatric hospital where he died five years later.
This left Lovecraft to be raised by his mother, two aunts, and grandfather.
Due to poor health, he didn’t attend public school for long, instead spending much of his time at home where he was an avid reader.
He did attend high school for some time but left after a nervous breakdown. His grandfather’s death didn’t help the family situation either.
They were forced to move to a smaller home due to problems with the management of his grandfather’s estate.
While Lovecraft wrote poetry in his youth, he really prioritized his writing career when he joined the United Amateur Press Association.
He began submitting many of his stories, poems and essays to magazines. His first professional publication was in 1919, the same year his mother was committed after suffering from depression and hysteria.
Lovecraft found much of his success in the pulp magazine Weird Tales, in which he was first published in 1923.
He was briefly married and moved to New York City but financial difficulties led to him returning to Rhode Island after an amicable split with his wife.
He continued to write throughout his life, seeing his most prolific period during the last several years of his life.
He died from intestinal cancer in 1937.
Even though Lovecraft might not have seen immense financial success during his lifetime, later writers have been greatly influenced by his work.
Selected Reading: The Call of Cthulhu The Shadow Over Innsmouth At the Mountains of Madness
Source: Ten Early Masters of Horror Genre

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