Monster Soup (polluted Thames Water) by Pry, 1828.

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Coloured satirical engraving by William Heath (1795-1840), also know by his pseudonym Paul Pry, showing a lady discovering the quality of the Thames water.
The top title reads: ‘Microcosm dedicated to the London Water Companies. Brought forth all monstrous, all prodigious things, hydras and organs, and chimeras dire.’ The bottom title reads:
‘Monster Soup commonly called Thames Water being a correct representation of that precious stuff doled out to us!’.
It is probably a reference to the water distributed by the Chelsea Water works.
By the 1820s, public concern was growing at the increasingly polluted water supply taken from the Thames in London.
In 1831 and 1832 the city experienced its first outbreaks of cholera.
via Image of ‘monster soup’, 1828. by Science & Society Picture Library.

Henley Regatta Fashions from the Past.

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Oxfordshire hosts something called the Henley Royal Regatta—“one of the quintessential British events of the summer season,” according to WWD.
Apparently it’s quite an occasion and has happened annually since 1839.
Consequently, old photos are an absolute treasure trove of bygone ladies’ fashions.
1329077599229397393Boaters en route to the regatta, 1886.
Lady, sit down in that boat or you’re gonna topple us all into the drink:
Some Classic, Corseted Regatta Fashions from Days Gone By
Here’s a colorised glimpse:
1329077599293399185via Some Classic, Corseted Regatta Fashions from Days Gone By.

Artist who Made Colouring Books Cool again is back..

Johanna Basford, whose fanciful, hand-drawn illustrations launched a worldwide craze, is back with flying colors.
Not far from Johanna Basford’s home on the northeast coast of Scotland lies a parabola of golden-ocher sand where the proportion of sky to land is unlike anything you’ll likely see outside of a Bertolucci film.
A wildlife Eden, this stretch of heathland serves as a motorway for birds that wheel in from the Arctic—red-throated divers, pink-footed geese and long-tailed ducks with cream and chocolate plumage.
During the summer months, strong gusts combined with the powdery sand can ruin a perfectly good sandwich.
Throughout the winter the shoreline is invariably a few degrees warmer than inland. On this biting afternoon, the sea changes shades with each shift of cloud and rain and wind. Basford sits in a pub in nearby Ellon, her hands wrapped around a cup of English breakfast tea, comparing the colors of nature with those found in a 120-pack of Crayola crayons.
“As a child, I used to think the yellow and the white were just a bit redundant,” she says in a soft burr that tends to drift upward at the end of a sentence, making statements sound like questions. “But I don’t think I had any specific favorite colors.
I do remember the day that I learned that if you heated up the crayons, you could bend them. And that was a revelation.”The 35-year-old Basford is something of a revelation herself.
She’s a pioneer—possibly the pioneer—of the modern adult coloring book, a childhood pastime retrofitted for frazzled grown-ups.
When the genre stormed the best-seller lists five years ago, Basford’s debut, Secret Garden, led the charge. It’s filled with filigreed visions of ferns and flowers and frogs rendered delicately in black and white, all drawn by hand.
“I had a hunch that there were adults out there who would love to return to the days of finger-paints and carefree playing with color,” says Basford, a freelance illustrator whose initial pitch to a publisher was met with baffled silence.
“The first print run was a tentative 13,000 copies. I was fairly certain my mum was going to have to buy a lot.”Secret Garden turned out to be a runaway sensation, selling 12 million copies worldwide, including nearly four million in China over less than three months.
Translated into 45 languages, it was also a huge hit in Brazil (1.6 million), the United States (1.7 million) and France (350,000), where it outsold the country’s most popular cookbooks.
“I love the idea of chic Parisian ladies putting down their saucepans in favor of gel pens,” Basford says. In South Korea, sales of 1.5 million suggest that nearly 3 percent of the population owns a copy.
By 2016, adult coloring books had their own dedicated sections on Amazon and in big-box stores. Demand caused worldwide pencil shortages, and Faber-Castell, the planet’s biggest wooden-pencil manufacturer, had to add shifts at its Bavarian factory to keep pace with global demand.”
Read on Further via Source: The Artist Who Made Coloring Books Cool for Adults Returns With a New Masterpiece | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian

The Brill Windmill, Buckinghamshire.

The 17th-century Brill windmill in Buckinghamshire, England (Photographic source Wikimedia Commons).
The Brill windmill, was last owned and used by the Pointer and Nixie family who also baked bread in their house in the village.
With timbers dating from 1685, Brill Windmill provides one of the earliest and best preserved examples of a post mill (the earliest type of European windmill) in the UK.
Management and ownership of the Grade II listed mill was passed to Buckinghamshire County Council in 1947 who, through a number of major interventions, have ensured that the mill still stands today.
In 1967 the Council installed a structural steel framework that helps to support the mill’s ancient timber frame but means that the mill is static and can no longer turn to face the wind.
via Wikipedia