The Psychedelic Bund Sightseeing Tunnel, Shanghai.

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Photo by Mr Michael Phams on Flickr | Copyright: Creative Commons.
When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro.
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After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space.
The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…”
It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate. 
The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects.

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Source: Bund Sightseeing Tunnel | Atlas Obscura

The Silent Darien, the Gap in the World’s Longest Road.

_76923932_pek-in-darienStretching from Alaska to the pencil tip of Argentina, the 48,000km-long Pan-American Highway holds the record for the world’s longest motorable road. But there is a gap – an expanse of wild tropical forest – that has defeated travellers for centuries.
Explorers have always been drawn to the Darien Gap, but the results have mostly been disastrous. The Spanish made their first settlement in the mainland Americas right here in 1510, only to have it torched by indigenous tribes 14 years later – and in many ways the area remains as wild today as it was during the days of the conquest.
“If history had followed its usual course, the Darien should be today one of the most populated regions in the Americas, but it isn’t,” says Rick Morales, a Panamian and owner of Jungle Treks, one of a few adventure tour companies operating in the region.
“That’s remarkable if you consider that we live in the 21st Century, in a country that embraces technology and is notorious for connecting oceans, cultures, and world commerce.”
The gap stretches from the north to the south coast of Panama – from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It’s between 100km and 160km (60-100 miles) long, and there is no way round, except by sea.
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Read more via BBC News – Silent Darien: The gap in the world’s longest road.

Daybreak at Monument Valley.

Image Credit: Photograph by Lidija Kamansky.
A storm was rolling in from the west and the few of us gathered for sunrise were watching and hoping that day would break before the rains came.
The moment the sun peeked above the horizon, we were hit with incredible winds and sideways driving rain.
My husband jumped behind me to block the blowing sand and to try to shelter me from the wind.
I kept shooting as the skies lit up, while gripping the tripod to keep it steady.
This image is the result of those efforts from this memorable sunrise!
Source: Daybreak at Monument Valley Photo by Lidija Kamansky — National Geographic Your Shot

Northern Lights reflect off Kerid Volcanic Crater Lake.

Photographer Sigurdur William camped out at the edge of the Kerid volcanic crater lake in Iceland where he captured this unusual view of the Northern lights and stars reflected on the water’s surface.
Located in southern Iceland the Kerid is one of many crater lakes in the area that are frequented by locals and tourists alike, some of who visit through Sigurdur William’s photography tour business Arctic Shots.
(via Astronomy Picture of the Day)
Source: A Stunning View of the Northern Lights over Iceland Reflected in a Volcanic Crater Lake | Colossal

The Ancient Incan Rings of Moray, Peru.

imageContributor: leiris
Grouped together in Peru’s lush Cuzco region, the ringed Incan ruins known as Moray have long been a mystery, but it is looking more and more likely that the nested stone rings may have been part of a large-scale agricultural experiment.
Unlike a number of the elaborate metropolises and statuary left behind by the Incan people, the rings at Moray are relatively simple but may have actually been an ingenious series of test beds.
Descending in grass-covered, terraced rings, these rings of rings vary in size, with the largest ending in a depth of 30 meters (98 feet) deep and 220 meters (722 feet) wide.
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Studies have shown that many of the terraces contain soil that must have been imported from other parts of the region.
The temperature at the top of the pits varies from that at the bottom by as much as 15ºC, creating a series of micro-climates that — not coincidentally — match many of the varied conditions across the Incan empire, leading to the conclusion that the rings were used as a test bed to see what crops could grow where.
Edited by: SkareMedia (Author), Rachel (Admin), oriana (Admin), EricGrundhauser (Admin)
via Moray | Atlas Obscura.

“Place-Hacking” Paris and the UK.

Place Hacking

Saint Sulpice Church, Paris
They call themselves “place hackers”—urban adventurers who get a thrill (and bragging rights) from exploring forbidden spaces: old military bases, sewer systems, decommissioned hospitals, power stations—even the odd skyscraper under construction.
Just like backpackers, they have an ethical code: no vandalism or theft, take only photographs, leave only footprints.
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Forth Rail Bridge, Scotland.
“The idea behind urban exploration is revealing what’s hidden,” explains Bradley Garrett, author of the recent book Explore Everything: Place Hacking the City.
“It’s about going into places that are essentially off limits and, because they are off limits, have been relatively forgotten.” The goal is not just to explore, he adds, but to document and share as well.
Place Hacking King’s Reach Tower, London
See more Images via These Beautiful “Place-Hacking” Photos Will Give You an Adrenaline Rush | Mother Jones.