The Baby Jumping Festival of Castrillo de Murcia.

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The Baby Jumping Festival – Photo by Celestebombin on Wikipedia | Copyright: Creative Commons
Whereas most Catholics are baptized into their religion as infants by being gently dunked under cleansing waters, absolving them of their innate original sin, in the Spanish village of Castrillo de Murcia fresh babes are laid in the street as men dressed in traditional devil costumes run around jumping over them, terrorizing onlookers.
The yearly festival known locally as “El Colacho” takes place during the village’s religious feast of Corpus Christi.
No concrete origin for the bizarre ritual exists, but it dates back to at least the early 1600s.
During the holiday parents with children born during the previous year bring the little tikes out and place them in neat rows of pillows spaced out down a public street.
Then, while the excited parents look on, men dressed in bright yellow costumes, and grotesque masks begin filing through the crowd, whipping bystanders with switches and generally terrorizing everyone.
But this is all fun and games as the main event is when these “devils” run down the street jumping over the rows of babies like Olympic hurdlers.
Once the little sinners have been jumped over they are considered absolved of man’s original transgression, and they are sprinkled with rose petals before being taken away by their (likely very relieved) parents.
While there are no reports of injuries or babalities caused by the flying devils, the strange practice is frowned upon by the clergy of the Catholic Church with the Pope going so far as to ask the Spanish people to distance themselves from the ritual.
However El Colacho continues to take place each year.
No one can tell this village that they can’t send their devil-men careening over helpless infants.
Edited by: Allison (Admin), EricGrundhauser (Admin)
via The Baby Jumping Festival | Atlas Obscura.

The Tomatina Festival, Bunol.

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Thousands take part in Spain’s Tomatina festival
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Thousands of revelers painted the town red as they took part in the La Tomatina festival in Bunol, Spain.
Check out all the action from the annual tomato food fight.
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See more Images via Tomatina festival in Bunol, Spain – Thousands take part in Spain’s Tomatina festival – NY Daily News.

Canfranc Railway Station deserted since 1970.

Canfranc railway station in Aragon, Spain.
Opened in 1928, it was the stunning centrepiece of the line between Béarn and Aragon, across the French-Spanish border.
But in 1970 a runaway train destroyed a bridge on the French side.
They decided not to rebuild it, and as a result the station was abandoned.
Image Credit: Photograph by Alamy/Ed Cumming.
See more via Pretty vacant: the glory of abandoned spaces | Art and design | The Guardian

Night Storm in Ibiza.

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Justin Gardner is a professional photographer, specializing in event, still life and landscape photography.
He captured the moment that Mother Nature upstaged a fireworks display with her very own “lightening” show.
The Ibiza-based photographer captured this spectacular “man vs nature” moment, from his roof terrace in Figueretas during the Assumption of Mary Bank Holiday celebrations.
Commenting on his photo, Justin says: “I went outside to the sound of fireworks and was blown away by the storm in the distance.
It was an awesome display from both man and nature, so I grabbed my camera to capture this dramatic image”.
Justin took a photo with long exposure and added a few adjustments to the curves, cropped and sharpened to create the final image.
Photograph “Man Vs Nature” © Justin Gardner, 2015 – All Rights Reserved.
More info: justingardner.co.uk | Facebook
via Man Vs Nature: Photographer Captures Incredible Moment During The Storm In Ibiza | Bored Panda.

Running with the Bulls in Pamplona.

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 Revelers run with Torrestrella’s fighting bulls along the Calle Estafeta during the second day of the San Fermin Running Of The Bulls festival on July 7, 2014 in Pamplona, Spain. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images) 
The history of the bullrunning in Pamplona is not clear. There is evidence of the festival from as far back as the 13th century when it seems the events took place in October as this coincided with the festival of San Fermin on October 10th.
It seems that the modern day celebration has evolved from this as well as individual commercial and bullfighting fiestas which can be traced back to the 14th century.
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Over many years the mainly religious festival of San Fermin was diluted by music, dancing, bullfights and markets such that the Pamplona Council proposed that the whole event be moved to July 7th when the weather is far more conducive to such a celebration.
To this day San Fermin remains a fixed date every year with the first bullrun at 8am on July 7th and the last at the same time on July 14.
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The joining together of the religious, commercial and bullfighting festivals and the move to July 7th led to the first official celebration of San Fermines in 1591.
This inaugural fiesta was a low key affair in comparison to the modern day running of the bulls as it only lasted two days although there was much merriment involving music, a procession and a bullfight.
via Running of the Bulls in Pamplona | San Fermin.