‘Il Tiberio’ Magazine, Barcelona, 1890s.

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Il Tiberio was a manuscript magazine produced in Barcelona at the end of the 19th century.
It contained articles, reviews of artistic and other cultural and political matters, and original drawings.
Contributors included such writers and artists as Marià Pidelaserra, Gaietà Cornet, Ramon and Juli Borrell, Emili Fontbona, Filibert Montagut, Josep Victor Solà Andreu, Joan Comellas i Viñals, and Ramon Riera Moliner.
They were all members of a group that had formed in the classrooms of Acadèmia Borrell and the tavern El Rovell de l’Ou, located on Hospital Street in Barcelona.
The Catalan painter Pere Ysern Alié received the magazine in Rome, where he went in 1896−98 to further his artistic training.
Through it, Ysern kept informed about Catalan current affairs and about the activities of the group of intellectuals and artists of which he was part, and who were his friends and colleagues.
The magazine was so named because Il Tiberio was the nickname that Riera Moliner used for Pere Ysern.
In all, 35 issues plus five special issues of Il Tiberio appeared between November 15, 1896 and May 1, 1898.
Read on via Il Tiberio, Number 1, 15 November 1896 – World Digital Library.

Two Mandrills in a Huddle.

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Conspiration – Portrait of two suspicious Mandrills.
When the eyes say one thing.
The mandrill is a primate of the Old World monkey family, closely related to the baboons and even more closely to the drill. It is found in southern Cameroon, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, and Congo
Pedro Jarque KrebsToledo, Spain
Member since 2015.
Photo Information: Copyright: Pedro Jarque Krebs. Photo Location: Madrid, Spain
Source: Conspiration | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

The Baby Jumping Festival of Castrillo de Murcia.

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The Baby Jumping Festival – Photo by Celestebombin on Wikipedia | Copyright: Creative Commons
Whereas most Catholics are baptized into their religion as infants by being gently dunked under cleansing waters, absolving them of their innate original sin, in the Spanish village of Castrillo de Murcia fresh babes are laid in the street as men dressed in traditional devil costumes run around jumping over them, terrorizing onlookers.
The yearly festival known locally as “El Colacho” takes place during the village’s religious feast of Corpus Christi.
No concrete origin for the bizarre ritual exists, but it dates back to at least the early 1600s.
During the holiday parents with children born during the previous year bring the little tikes out and place them in neat rows of pillows spaced out down a public street.
Then, while the excited parents look on, men dressed in bright yellow costumes, and grotesque masks begin filing through the crowd, whipping bystanders with switches and generally terrorizing everyone.
But this is all fun and games as the main event is when these “devils” run down the street jumping over the rows of babies like Olympic hurdlers.
Once the little sinners have been jumped over they are considered absolved of man’s original transgression, and they are sprinkled with rose petals before being taken away by their (likely very relieved) parents.
While there are no reports of injuries or babalities caused by the flying devils, the strange practice is frowned upon by the clergy of the Catholic Church with the Pope going so far as to ask the Spanish people to distance themselves from the ritual.
However El Colacho continues to take place each year.
No one can tell this village that they can’t send their devil-men careening over helpless infants.
Edited by: Allison (Admin), EricGrundhauser (Admin)
via The Baby Jumping Festival | Atlas Obscura.

The Tomatina Festival, Bunol.

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Thousands take part in Spain’s Tomatina festival
Saucy!
Thousands of revelers painted the town red as they took part in the La Tomatina festival in Bunol, Spain.
Check out all the action from the annual tomato food fight.
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See more Images via Tomatina festival in Bunol, Spain – Thousands take part in Spain’s Tomatina festival – NY Daily News.