The Steamrail Rolls into Bendigo.

111215
The steamrail rolls in.  by Meg West · · From Snapped: My town
On occasion, the old steamrail rolls through Bendigo on its way through to Echuca.
This can be during the day or in the middle of the night.
We went out for a 1am viewing at the Bendigo Train Station.
Image CreditMeg West, Contributor, Kangaroo Flat VIC 3555.
via ABC OPEN: The steamrail rolls in || From Project: Snapped: My town.

Locomotives by Roy Stryker, 1942.

One of the great innovations in a sea of great things accomplished during the Franklin Roosevelt administrations was the formation of the Farm Security Administration, a division of the government established to help farmers through the devastating Dust Bowl and Great Depression.
A subset of the FSA was a photographic unit which was set up to document the progress made by the FSA (and provide, I am sure, for some much-needed good news, a hearts-and-minds campaign).
6a00d83542d51e69e201bb07b0980e970d-500wi
This division was headed by Roy Emerson Stryker, who wound up with the greatest and most beautiful photographic history ever assembled in the United States.
There were about 77,000 images made, and I recall reading (somewhere) that the total budget for the Stryker group for the years 1936-1942 was about $100,000, meaning that each completed image cost just over a dollar apiece.

So far as art funding by the government is concerned, that about the best it has done.
See more at this great website via JF Ptak Science Books: PowerPunk Locomotives, in Color (1942).

Abandoned train tracks and small-town history.

All Photos by Greg Davis
An amateur photographer with a passion for preserving Australian history is using old railway lines to lead him to relics that have withstood the test of time.
Sydney real estate agent Greg Davis spends his spare time photographing neglected and historical buildings, abandoned bridges and disused train stations around Australia.”They were probably good little towns when they were going, but now you go there and there is half a dozen buildings left,” he said.
So far, he has photographed towns in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia.His most recent expedition was to Western Australia. in March.
Mr Davis edits and researches all the buildings and landmarks so he can provide information with the images.
“I was always amazed by roads that had closed or old bridges, but your parents would never want to stop the car to let you have a look,” he said.
Fast-forward more than 50 years and social media helped him realise other people shared his interest in small-town history.
Source: Amateur photographer follows old train tracks across country to document small-town history – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

London to Fort William by rail.

Some of the world’s wildest and most beautiful scenery is best enjoyed from a train window. From Lhasa to Lima, we choose brilliant and great value routes

Highland flung… the Glenfinnan Viaduct, on the way to Fort William. Photograph: Alan Copson/Getty Images
London to Fort William, UK.  Duration: 13 hours.
The Caledonian Sleeper, one of Britain’s last sleeper services (the other is the Night Riviera to Penzance), is getting a £100m upgrade.
The new trains will have double beds, en suites, Highland food and Arran toiletries.
They’ll run first on the Lowland route from London to Edinburgh/Glasgow in October, then join the Highland route to Fort William next year.
The Highland service, called the Deerstalker, is one of the best train journeys in Britain.
After Glasgow, it goes past Loch Treig to the foot of Ben Nevis. From Fort William, the line continues to Mallaig, across the Glenfinnan viaduct – of Harry Potter fame – for ferries to Skye.
via 18 of the world’s best rail journeys | Travel | The Guardian

The Quintinshill Railway Disaster, 1915.

1263768732489196328
The worst railroad disaster in history occurred on 22 May, 1915 near Gretna Green, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.
It is commonly known as the Quintinshill Disaster, having been named for the location of a nearby intermediate signal box with passing loops on each side on the Caledonian Railway Main Line linking Glasgow and Carlisle.
The crash, which involved five trains, killed a probable 226 people and injured 246 others. Those killed were mainly territorial soldiers from the Royal Scots heading for Gallipoli front in the First World War.
The precise number of dead was never established with certainty as the roll list of the regiment was destroyed by the fire. The crash occurred when a troop train travelling from Larbert, Stirlingshire to Liverpool, Lancashire collided with a local passenger train that had been shunted on to the main line, to then be hit by an express train to Glasgow which crashed into the wreckage a minute later.
Gas from the lighting system of the old wooden carriages of the troop train ignited, starting a fire which soon engulfed the three passenger trains and also two goods trains standing on nearby passing loops.
A number of bodies were never recovered, having been wholly consumed by the fire. The bodies that were recovered were buried together in a mass grave in Edinburgh’s Rosebank Cemetery.
Such was the scope of the disaster that many of the rescuers wrongly assumed the trains had been targets of German saboteurs. Four bodies, believed to be of children, were never identified or claimed and are buried in the Western Necropolis, Glasgow.
The cause of the accident was poor working practices on the part of the two signalmen involved. It was discovered that the two men often colluded to falsify their records of when they relieved each other, routinely did not follow regulations properly, and engaged in other unsafe practices.
The results of the official inquiry into the disaster led to their imprisonment for culpable homicide after legal proceedings in both Scotland and England.
A memorial to the dead soldiers was erected soon after the accident. There are a number of more recent memorials at various locations.
An annual remembrance service is held at Rosebank Cemetery.
via YouRememberThat.Com – Taking You Back In Time… – 1915 Scottish Railroad Disaster.

The Last Railway – the West Indies.

p02fn87f
On an island some 29km long and 8km wide, with its west side bordering the Caribbean Sea and its eastern side facing the Atlantic Ocean, history moves forward – albeit slowly and shakily – in the form of the Saint Kitts Scenic Railway.
Dubbed the “last railway in the West Indies” and one of the few of its kind, the narrow gauge railway loops travellers 29km through verdant jungles, over canyon-spanning steel bridges and along the island’s rocky coast.
p02fn86xChristopher Columbus discovered the islands of Saint Kitts and Nevis in 1493, during an exploration to the New World.
Some say he chose to simply name it after his likeness (the isle is more formally known as Saint Christopher Island).
Others maintain that he thought it resembled the shape of St Christopher, the patron saint of travellers, carrying the Christ child on his shoulder.
Whatever the case, the discovery spawned battle upon battle between the British and French over the colonisation of the islands, which were home to fresh water, large salt deposits and – above all – fertile soil.
index
Read on via BBC – Travel – The last railway in the West Indies : Caribbean & Bermuda.