Riding the Rails at the Hollycoombe Steam Fair.

A steam train takes fairground visitors on a train ride at Hollycoombe steam fair in Liphook, England.
Hollycoombe has opened its doors to the public again this year over the Easter weekend.
It first opened in 1971 and includes a variety of Edwardian fairground rides all powered by steam.
Image Credit: Photograph by #Chris J Ratcliffe / Getty.
Source: Photos of the Week: 4/15–4/21 – The Atlantic

Reflections in a Train Carriage.

Image Credit: Photograph by Eric Etchart, the Winner.
This man was sitting near me on the Eurostar to Paris and spent the whole journey looking out of the window.
It was a sunny day and I managed to capture some great reflections.
PAUL GOLDSTEIN, JUDGE commented: This could have been taken at any time in the last 50 years – there is something almost timeless about this intricate study.
The train carriage is a little sleazy and the window full of condensation adding to the griminess of the reflection. but this is not the photographer’s fault. Winner by a nose.
Source: Readers’ travel photography competition: September – the winners | Travel | The Guardian

Abandoned Mail Rail Tunnel.

mail-rail-london-post-office-railwayAll images by cakehole
Abandoned subway stations, such as the ‘ghost stations’ of the Paris Metro, have long been sought out by urban explorers.
The narrow-gauge Post Office Railway (aka Mail Rail), inspired by a similar freight network built by the Chicago Tunnel Company, opened in 1927 and operated between the Paddington Sorting Office and Whitechapel Eastern Delivery Office.
mail-rail-london-post-office-railway-6The railway, which served eight stations along 6.5 miles (10.5 km) of track, was closed for financial reasons in 2003 after 75 years of operation.
But as the images show, the deserted network remains in good condition today.
Source: Urban Ghosts Exploring the Deserted Tunnels of London’s Post Office Railway | Urban Ghosts

Rusting away in The Lebanon.

An old locomotive rusts inside the abandoned Riyaq train station in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley on May 1, 2019.
Rail transport in Lebanon began in the 1890s as French projects under the Ottoman empire, but largely ceased in the 1970s owing to the country’s civil war.
The last remaining routes ended for economic reasons in the 1990s. At its peak, Lebanon had about 408 kilometers of railway.
Image Credit: Photograph by Joseph Eid / AFP / Getty
Source: Photos of the Week: German Asparagus, Traffic Zebras, Enormous Bear – The Atlantic