The Baobab Tree Lives On.

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“The baobab is the national tree of Madagascar.
Of the nine genera in the Word, six are found only in Madagascar [two are in Arabia and one in Australia].
However due to deforestation, three of these baobab species are endangered and facing a serious threat of extinction,” says photographer Emiline.
“This photo was taken at the famous ‘Avenue des Baobabs’ which is found along a dirt road in the Menabe region of Madagascar, near the city of Morondava.
The trees are thought to be up to 800 years old and remain under threat from slash-and-burn agriculture, encroaching rice paddies, overgrazing and bark collection.
In recent years the Malagasy authorities and some NGOs have taken some conservation measures to protect their precious forests, including this beautiful area in the western Madagascar.”
Photo credit: Emiline
via Saved: Wildlife in Earth’s protected areas.

Something Grimm in Cologne.

o-GRIMM1-900by Candace Kita
Once upon a time, there lived a photographer named Kilian Schönberger – and while he is not a character from your favorite fairy tale, his very real images spin some otherworldly fantasies.
Working in Cologne, Germany, the photographer’s own backyard serves as the source for his “Brothers Grimm’s Homeland” series and captures the woodlands and waterfalls that served as a backdrop for many infamous folktales.
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Schönberger – who, ironically, is color-blind – perfectly blends the misty, magical, and macabre in his intensely-atmospheric photographs.
Presenting everything from thickets full of brilliant sunlight to copses where things go bump in the night, his landscapes speak to the battles of good, evil, and everything in-between that pervade folklore tradition.
Although his images more often feature gingerbread cottages and ancient castles than human characters, Little Red Riding Hood would look perfectly natural running through them.
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See more Images via There’s Something Grimm About These Photos.

The Emu War of 1932.

emuThis is perhaps the only formal war where one of the belligerents was not human, but rather avian.
In 1932, the emu population in Australia was growing out of control, with an estimated 20,000 emus running around the Australian desert and causing havoc among crops.
In response, the Australian military sent out a task force of soldiers armed with machine guns to kill the emus and even jokingly declared war on them.
In mid-November they drove out into the desert and proceeded to hunt down any emus they could find.
However, they ran into complications; the emus proved remarkably resilient, even when struck by multiple machine gun bullets they continued to run away, easily outstripping the heavily laden soldiers.
The Emu War lasted for nearly a week before Major Meredith, the commander of the emu-killing task-force gave up in disgust after the soldiers only bagged a fraction of the elusive birds.
War duration: (November 11-18 1932) Seven days.
Casualties: 2,500 emus.

‘Wings’ flies into Melbourne.

BPP-Wings-web-3-of-6-Image-by-Jarrad-SengHave you ever had a dream about flying? Or are you more a walking down the street naked kind of person?
We try not to encourage public nudity, but if you’d like to fulfill your dream of having wings, then there is a way you can.
Street artist Colette Miller believes that humanity craves beauty and she wants to bring it to them in her own medium. What she came up with was a street art phenomenon called Wings.
The pieces usually stand around three metres high are vibrantly coloured and located in places you won’t expect. Rather than putting them in a museum, she uses the wings to spruce up dull corporate facades.
They act as a sign of fearlessness and imagination in the concrete jungle.
via New street art flies into Melbourne – Bourne this Way.

Afternoon Gold, Barraba.

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Afternoon gold:
Image Credit: Photograph by Martin Unwin.
I walked out into our street in Barraba, New South Wales and took about 60 photos, from grey clouds over golden hills to golden, then purple clouds as the panorama unfolded.
This photo is from about the middle of the ‘show’.
No photoshopping involved!
via ABC OPEN: Afternoon gold || From Project: Snapped: My town.

Ruth Glacier, Central Alaska.

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Photo Credit:
http://goo.gl/et7dQl
The Ruth Glacier, in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska, covers an enormous area in the heart of the central Alaska Range.
Located about 3 miles vertically below the summit of Mt. McKinley, it catches all the snow that falls on the southeast side of the mountain, and as the accumulated snow and ice that makes up the glacier slides down the slope, it get squeezed through a one-mile-wide bottleneck of what is called the Great Gorge.
The Great Gorge is one of the most spectacular gorges on earth. It runs for a length of 16 km and drops almost 2,000 feet over the distance, creating a grade that forces the Ruth Glacier to descend at an impressive pace of a meter a day.
On either side of the gorge are solid granite cliffs that tower 5,000 feet above the glacier’s surface. The depth of the ice within the gorge is more than 3,800 feet.
If the ice were to melt tomorrow, it could create an abyss 2.6 km deep or more than one-half times deeper than the Grand Canyon.
The mountain lining the walls of the Great Gorge rises sporadically into towering spires and has been given names such as Moose’s Tooth, Broken Tooth, Bear Tooth and Wisdom Tooth, to name a few, and really look like animals’ teeth.
So immense are these spires that what appear to be tiny flakes on these walls are actually ledges wide enough to park a tractor trailer.
As the Ruth Glacier flows down a steeper gradient, it tears and fractures into a treacherous 10-square mile section known as the Ruth Ice Fall near the bottom of the Great Gorge.
During summer after the snowmelt, this section becomes virtually impassable.
via The Great Gorge of the Ruth Glacier | Amusing Planet.