‘Journey’ Photos by Danny Lyon.

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Continuing in the tradition of Walker Evans and Robert Frank, Lyon forged a new style of documentary photography, described as “New Journalism,” where the photographer immerses himself in his subject’s world.

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From images of the Civil Rights movement made during his early days as one of the first staff photographers for SNCC, to his classic series The Bikeriders documenting a Chicago biker gang, to his in-depth study of Texan prisons in 1966-67, Danny Lyon has documented the harsh realities of American life for the past 50 years.

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Each of these projects was accompanied by books, which have become classics in the field.
Source: Juxtapoz Magazine – Danny Lyon’s “Journey” @ Edwynn Houk Gallery

Crystal Palace in Victorian Britain.

Crystal Palace, Sydenham, London.
The Crystal Palace was a cast-iron and plate-glass structure originally built in Hyde Park, London, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851.
More than 14,000 exhibitors from around the world gathered in its 990,000-square-foot (92,000 m2) exhibition space to display examples of technology developed in the Industrial Revolution.
It was relocated to Sydenham only a few years later and destroyed by fire in 1936.
Image Credit: The Francis Frith Collection/Cover Images
via Victorian Britain: Fascinating photographs show lives of people over 150 years ago | The Independent

‘Baby in a Basin’ by William Warren 1875.

A number of years ago, I came across a copy of this carte de visite (CDV) photograph, copyrighted 1875 by the photographer William Shaw Warren of Boston.
It is without doubt the source image for a trade card design issued by Pond’s Extract, a patent medicine of the day.
Quite possibly the photograph was commissioned by The Pond’s Extract Company specifically to create their pond-pun trade card image.
The trade card can be found in a number of slight variations.

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This one was printed by Mayer, Merkel & Ottman of New York City.

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This one, in color, was produced by the firm of A.J. Maerz of Brooklyn.
Continue reading at Dick Sheaff’s wonderful blog via Baby in a Basin | Sheaff : ephemera

The Albion Hotel, Adelaide.

Man and children standing in front of the partially demolished old Albion Hotel, Morphett Street c.1910
by Jessica Barrett
My third great-grandfather, George Mather arrived in South Australia late in 1864.
A publican, the first hotel he took over was the Albion Hotel located on Morphett Street and his first order of business was to hold a Grand Opening Ball on 26 December 1864.
George continued with the licence to run the Albion until it was transferred to John Lamb on 13 June 1866.
While some early pubs were substantial structures with several public rooms, away from main city streets the pub could be a private home with one room set up as a bar and one for overnight guests.
From the 1850s pub facades began to resemble shop fronts, but interiors changed little until the late 1860s when the Licensing Bench demanded minimal room sizes and numbers of rooms.
Pub styles reached their zenith between the late 1870s and 1910, by which time most pre-1860 pubs had been rebuilt or new ones established.
Usually Italianate, with shady balconies and verandahs with balustrades of ornate cast iron, these hotels have contributed significantly to Adelaide’s townscape.
via Albion Hotel Ball | SA History Hub 

The Secret Origins of Wonder Woman.

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Noted Psychologist Revealed as Author of Best-Selling ‘Wonder Woman,’” read the astonishing headline.
In the summer of 1942, a press release from the New York offices of All-American Comics turned up at newspapers, magazines and radio stations all over the United States.
The identity of Wonder Woman’s creator had been “at first kept secret,” it said, but the time had come to make a shocking announcement: “the author of ‘Wonder Woman’ is Dr. William Moulton Marston, internationally famous psychologist.” The truth about Wonder Woman had come out at last.
Or so, at least, it was made to appear. But, really, the name of Wonder Woman’s creator was the least of her secrets.
Wonder Woman is the most popular female comic-book superhero of all time.
Aside from Superman and Batman, no other comic-book character has lasted as long.
Generations of girls have carried their sandwiches to school in Wonder Woman lunchboxes. Like every other superhero, Wonder Woman has a secret identity.
Unlike every other superhero, she also has a secret history.
In one episode, a newspaper editor named Brown, desperate to discover Wonder Woman’s past, assigns a team of reporters to chase her down; she easily escapes them. Brown, gone half mad, is committed to a hospital.
Wonder Woman disguises herself as a nurse and brings him a scroll. “This parchment seems to be the history of that girl you call ‘Wonder Woman’!” she tells him. “A strange, veiled woman left it with me.” Brown leaps out of bed and races back to the city desk, where he cries out, parchment in hand, “Stop the presses! I’ve got the history of Wonder Woman!”
But Wonder Woman’s secret history isn’t written on parchment.
Instead, it lies buried in boxes and cabinets and drawers, in thousands of documents, housed in libraries, archives and collections spread all over the United States, including the private papers of creator Marston—papers that, before I saw them, had never before been seen by anyone outside of Marston’s family.
The veil that has shrouded Wonder Woman’s past for seven decades hides beneath it a crucial story about comic books and superheroes and censorship and feminism.
As Marston once put it, “Frankly, Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who, I believe, should rule the world.”
Read on via The Surprising Origin Story of Wonder Woman | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian.

Ladies on Bikes in Chicago, circa 1895.

Don’ts for Women on Bicycles in 1895The women’s rights advocate Susan B. Anthony may have said that the bicycle did “more to emancipate women than anything else in the world”, but the road along which it travelled was a bumpy one.
On 21st June 1895, the Newark Sunday Advocate ran the following article:
The Unique Cycling club of Chicago is all that its name implies.
One of its laws is that on all runs bloomers and knickerbockers shall be worn, and two members who disobeyed this rule recently met with a punishment that they will not forget soon.

Union park was the rendezvous for the last run, and 50 members turned out. The president, Miss Bunker, observed two women wearing short skirts over their bloomers.
“Take the skirts off,” ordered Captain Bunker.
“Indeed we won’t,” was the reply.
A crowd of 200 had collected to see the start.
The president and the captain held a consultation, and then, taking several strong armed members with them, fell on the skirt wearers and stripped them down to their bloomers.
“It was done in all seriousness,” said Mrs. Langdon. “The club’s rules are made to be kept and not to be broken. Why did we take off the skirts in public?
For no other reason but to make examples of the offenders. They publicly defied our rules and were punished accordingly.”
via vintage everyday: A List of Don’ts for Women on Bicycles in 1895.