Hanging Out in the Dolomites.

The-International-Highlin-017

The International Highline Meeting in Monte Piana, near Misurina, Italy. Balazs Mohai/epa/Corbis
Festival goers talk about the emotional comedown after tent and wellies are packed away for another year, but at the Highline festival in the Italian Dolomites, it’s a more physical thing.
The festival celebrates the extreme sport of slacklining (not to be confused with tightrope-walking) and attendees (slackers) spend their time living – and sleeping – on ropes slung hundreds of metres up in the air.
More trivial pursuits include yoga, music jams and film screenings. It’s held in September.
via World view: the festival in the Italian Dolomites where it’s cool to just hang | Travel | The Guardian.

The Nebitype, the Typesetter from Hell.

1967t01The Year was 1968. I was completing my composing apprenticeship with the Griffin Press, Marion Road, Netley.
My foreman was Alf Freeman, a bald Englishman who had come from England to originally work at the Government Printing Office.
Alf had left after a couple of years for the Griffin.
There I met Nick Penn, Colin Rawlings, Rod Baker, Ted Powell, Ken Simpson, Doug Long and Norm Morcombe all who went on to work at the Old Guv from the 1970s onwards.
However, the point of this tale is to get you to look at the above typecasting machine, the Nebitype.
It was made by the Nebiolo Company of Italy. The Nebitype was a line casting typesetter that spewed a single lead printing slug around 40 picas in length.
It was vaguely similar to the Ludlow Typesetter.
But there the similarity ended, unlike the Nebitype the Ludlow was a very reliable American typesetting machine.
But there was a problem with the Nebitype during its casting cycle and I suspected there was something up when the tradesmen refused to work it.
It was left up to the apprentices, especially the new ones, like me!
The Nebitype had a mind of its own and would often spray molten lead into the air.
Luckily, there was a comp. called Ken Costello (a ballroom dancing champion) who showed me the Nebitype survival plan.
You would place the setting stick in the jaws of the machine and then everyone would scatter.
Ken Costello had a rope tied to the casting handle and the other apprentices would hide behind a typesetting frame for safety.

Meanwhile, Ken would wave a red warning flag to keep people away.
Before hiding you tugged the rope, uttered a short prayer and the machine would shudder into action.
Did it work properly this time? Was the floor covered with molten lead?
It certainly made life interesting in the Griffin Press comp. room.
derwombat
 

Seagull has a fag in Rome.

A pesky seagull which is just one of the thousands that annoy tourists and citizens of Rome holds a cigarette in its beak near the Roman Forum on 11 March  2017 in Rome.
Image Credit: Photograph by #Tiziana Fabi / AFP / Getty.
Source: Photos of the Week: 3/11–3/17 – The Atlantic

de Kehtam’s ‘Fasiculus Medicine’ first Anatomy Book with Illustrations.

6a00d83542d51e69e2017d3e005a54970c
“For my part I deem those blessed to whom, by favour of the gods, it has been granted either to do what is worth writing of, or to write what is worth reading; above measure blessed those on whom both gifts have been conferred”–Pliny the Elder.
Johannes de Kehtam’s Fasciculus Medicine (printed in Venice in 1500) was the first anatomy book to be printed with illustrations.
Ketham was described as a German doctor living in Italy and may well have been Johann von Kerchheim, a German practising surgery and medicine in Venice during 1470), and who wrote a series of tracts on various aspects of medicine which were then collected into this single bound volume.
6a00d83542d51e69e2017ee57542ac970dThe illustrations are spectacular and to me have a very modern sensibility in their mid-Renaissance woodcut legacy–the look very clear and concise, are well proportioned, nicely labelled, and give plenty of free rein to open and blank spaces on the woodblock.
The only time these images really “fail” is when they appear in colour–a process that would’ve been undertaken privately, by the purchaser of the book, who would have contracted with an artisan to colo r the book.
The images in almost all of the cases of colouring that I have seen just do not match the elegance and brilliance of the original with no color.
Source for all images: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE,
Read on further via JF Ptak Science Books: First Printed & Illustrated Medical Book (1500)

Fracastoro, the Syphilis Poet by Titian.

girolamo-fracastoro-titian
Original Painting of Fracastoro by Titian.
A notorious 16th-century Italian’s portrait was acquired by the National Gallery in London in 1924.
His name? Girolamo Fracastoro. His claim to fame?
A word for the sexually transmitted disease that was terrifying his countrymen—syphilis—was derived from a poem he wrote.
The portrait was damaged, darkened by varnish, and unsigned, so the museum staff relegated it to a basement gallery despite Fracastoro’s renown.
Eventually, cleaning and conservation revealed the hand of a master artist.
After close examination, curators decided last year that the artist must be the famed Venetian painter known as Titian.
The portrait now hangs in one of the museum’s main galleries.
via Rediscovered Treasures

The Laughing Dormouse by Andrea Zampatti.

The laughing dormouse.
Andrea Zampatti’s dormouse, taken in Italy, wins the On the Land category of the competition.
Image Credit: Photograph by Andrea Zampatti / Barcroft Images
Source: The 2017 comedy wildlife photography awards | Environment | The Guardian

Light from Above, Santa Maddalena.

Light from Above.
The picture “Light from above” was taken in September 2016 in Santa Maddalena, Dolomiten, Italy.
Beautiful light and humidity stood behind the nice play of light and shadows that morning.
I was waiting as the small church was illuminated by the very first rays of Sun.
Image Credit: Photograph by Peter Svoboda, Slovakia National Award.
Source: The Winners Of 2017’s Sony World Photography Contest | Bored Panda

Dragonfly visits Milan’s ‘Library of Trees.’

Milan, Italy
A dragonfly perches on a pine branch at the ‘Library of Trees’ public park.
Transforming the grey city, began with the planting of seeds in September and by trees and plants in November 2017. There will be 450 trees from 19 species, 90,000 plants including hedges, shrubs and climbers.
The “Library of Trees” will be a 3,500m2 green space in the heart of Milan that is increasingly returning to nature.
The so called – vertical forest, aims to reduce pollution and to increase the biodiversity. The vertical forests concept has proven so popular that similar projects have been commissioned for Switzerland, Netherlands, and China.
Photograph: Luca Bruno/AP
Source: Pandas and pageantry: Tuesday’s top photos | News | The Guardian

‘Riding the Dreams’ by Pixel Pancho.

pixel-pancho-part-III-23
Riding the Dreams – The latest street art creations of Pixel Pancho – Artistes Street Art
We present a new selection of street art creations by Pixel Pancho, this Italian artist based in Turin which we have already talked about several times.
This prolific artist offers us again some very beautiful and poetic creations, skillfully combining organic and mechanical…
pixel-pancho-part-III-3
pixel-pancho-part-III-20
See more Images via Riding the Dreams – The latest street art creations of Pixel Pancho | Ufunk.net.

Italian Nuns First in Print, 1484.

95f81371c86342b40cf68bca51543042
The Nuns of San Jacopo di Ripoli
Italian, active 1476-1484
“Incunabula,” from the Latin for “swaddling clothes,” are the earliest books printed in the West, specifically those dated before 1501.
The first documented instance of women actually employed in printing comes from a manuscript kept at the Convent of San Jacopo di Ripoli in Florence.
Perhaps because their printing works was supervised by two male friars, the women’s contributions have been little noted until recently.
In 1999 the convent’s Diario, a type of account book and daily log, was published with a commentary and transcription by Melissa Conway.
As is evident in the colophon shown here, the nuns gave themselves no credit in the works they printed.
This example, The Conspiracy of Cataline by the Roman historian Sallust (86-34 B.C.), shows that these women were skillful and accurate — although not artful — compositors.
Their work is nevertheless of great importance to the history of women, as are their contributions to scholarship, particularly their magnum opus — and the last imprint of San Jacopo di Ripoli — the first complete printed edition of the works of Plato, published in 1484.
Crispi Salustii De coniuratione Catilinae liber incipit, printed by the Nuns of San Jacopo di Ripoli
via Unseen Hands: The Nuns of San Jacopo di Ripoli.