The Sweet Mr John Cadbury.

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John Cadbury (1802-1889) was born in Birmingham to Richard Tapper Cadbury, who was from a wealthy Quaker family that moved to the area from the west of England.
As a Quaker in the early 19th century, he was not allowed to enter a university, so could not pursue a profession such as medicine or law. As Quakers are pacifist, a military career was also out of the question.
So, like many other Quakers of the time, he turned his energies toward business and began a campaign against animal cruelty, forming the Animals Friend Society, a forerunner of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
Meanwhile, Cadbury’s manufacturing enterprise prospered, his brother David joined the business in 1848 and they rented a larger factory on Bridge Street.
Two years later, in 1850, the Cadbury brothers pulled out of the retail business, leaving it in the hands of John’s son, Richard Barrow Cadbury. (Barrow’s remained a leading Birmingham store until the 1960s.)
Benjamin and John Cadbury dissolved their partnership in 1860. John retired in 1861 due to the death of his wife, and his sons Richard and George succeeded him in the business. 
In 1879 they relocated to an area of what was then north Worcestershire, on the borders of the parishes of Northfield and King’s Norton centred on the Georgian built Bournbrook Hall, where they developed the garden village of Bournville; now a major suburb of Birmingham.

The family developed the Cadbury’s factory, which remains a key site of Cadbury.
The district around the factory has been ‘dry’ for over 100 years, with no alcohol being sold in pubs, bars or shops. Residents have fought to maintain this, winning a court battle in March 2007 with Britain’s biggest supermarket chain Tesco, to prevent it selling alcohol in its local outlet.
Read on via John Cadbury – Wikipedia

Night Market in Yangon, Myanmar.

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A view from above of a small night market tucked away in a hidden street of Yangon in Myanmar.
The people are busy buying and selling all types of produce at a number of very colourful stalls.
Image Credit: Photograph by Zay Yar Lin, All Rights Reserved, Yangon, Myanmar, Member since 2014.
Source: Night Market | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

Gerald’s famous Ice Cream Truck & Eatery, Mullins, Carolina.

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On a short-term assignment, I spent three months living in Mullins, South Carolina, a town of population 5,000. I grew to love the small town atmosphere where people’s histories go back to the days of “my great-great-great-granddaddy.”
Amongst the many South Carolinian traditions, there are certain specialties only known to the locals.
Point in case: Gerald’s famous ‘ice cream truck,’ where during lunchtime, you can go beyond the ice cream and get your true Southern eatin’ on.
Collard greens, mac ‘n cheese, candied yams, rice, and smothered pork chops galore with a dollop of Southern charm to match.
People like Gerald make small town Mullins big in heart.
 Photographer: Alice Yen
Alice Yen is an undergraduate at Duke University in Durham, NC and has conducted fieldwork research in southern Africa, the United Kingdom, rural areas of the United States, and most recently, central and southern Asia.
via The Best of Small Town America – Sixteen of the finest tiny towns in the United States. – Pictory.

John Macadam & his Famous Macadamia Nuts.

FeatureMacadamia nuts come from Australia, and the indigenous people there were eating them long before western botanists ever heard of them.
They’re named for a famous 19th century chemist/politician John Macadam, but he didn’t discover them or introduce them to the west.
His friend Ferdinand Von Mueller named them after him. That was after, as the story goes, Mueller sent the plant to be studied at the Botanical Gardens in Brisbane.

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John Macadam: The genus Macadamia (Macadamia nut) was named after him in 1857.
The director told a student to crack open the new nut for germination.
The student ate a few and said they were delicious.
After waiting to see whether or not the young man would die in the following days, the director tasted a few himself and declared Macadamias the finest nut to have ever existed.
via 12 Things You Didn’t Know Were Named After People | Mental Floss.

Eating Adelaide’s Infamous Pie Floater and what to expect.

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I guess most people realise that Australia was first populated by the Aboriginal people.
Then in the late eighteenth century the British our Imperial Overlords rocked up with their ships, diseases and rabbits.
“I say what an ‘orrible place this is, let’s populate it with the garbage from Britain”. “The poor, the Irish, union men and women, orphans, workhouse people and oh yes, some criminals”.
But not in South Australia, we are the State of the very poor free settlers that they wanted to get rid of anyway.
We came here in 1836 and started eating pie floaters soon afterwards.

What is a Pie Floater?

Some claim it is indigenous to South Australia, but I’m not so sure of that.
It is an Aussie Meat Pie, submerged in a sea of green pea soup, with the peas quite visible and topped with lashings of “dead horse” (tomato sauce) and vinegar if you so wish.
Sounds disgusting, yes, but wonderful to eat after a night on the piss in Adelaide, the city of churches.
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Where did you get it? For many years Cowley’s Bakery, based at Cross Road, South Plympton would park their pie cart outside of the Adelaide General Post Office in the City at night and dispense pie floaters late into the night for drunks, shift workers, unsuspecting tourists and coppers.

THE RESULTS:

A shortlived general feeling of wellbeing and happiness, perhaps a gentle vomit or two and for many hours afterwards a series of foul smelling, arse tearing, bowel burning pie floater farts.
They were Wonderful!         Rod