“The Odd Couple”.

oddcoupleIn this remarkable capture by Lassi Rautiainen we see an unlikely friendship between a bear and a wolf.
The two were spotted in the wilderness of Northern Finland where Rautiainen organizes wilderness trips for photographers and nature lovers through his family-run company, WILD FINLAND.
According to an interview with the Daily Mail, Rautiainen observed the young brown bear and grey wolf meeting up every night for ten straight days.
The two were spotted sharing meals together and Rautiainen believes they are both young and possibly unsure how to survive alone.

via Picture of the Day: The Odd Couple -TwistedSifter.

“A Magical Night.”

lapland-night-sky_94614_990x742“A Magical Night”Photograph by Satu Juvonen, National Geographic Your Shot
In Finland, a scattering of trees draped in heavy snow crosses the landscape, and the northern lights toss ribbons of color across the sky.
This image was shared by Your Shot member Satu Javonen, who writes, “[It was] a magical night in Lapland.
”This photo was submitted to Your Shot.

Source: Lapland Image, Finland | National Geographic Photo of the Day

“Tinja’s Husky Farm.”

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Tinja’s husky farm lies off the grid: she cooks and heats with a wood stove, lights her home with candles and has to break the ice of the river every morning to get some water with a bucket.
Image Credit: Photograph by Brice Portolano.
In northern Finland, husky farmers like Tinja will go more than a month without seeing the sun in winter.
Living 180 miles from the nearest town, she works in freezing temperatures for much of the year in order to feed and care for the 85 dogs on her farm.
When Brice Portolano arrived in Lapland in early January to see her, the polar night was beginning to end and the sun was slowly returning to the Arctic landscape.
“The first day lasted just nine minutes,” he says, “suffice to say, the evening are long and pass by in candle light”.

Capture

For 20 days, the Parisian-based photographer swapped his temperate city climate to stay in Inari with Tinja and her husband Alex, a former professional skier who now works as a race musher.
“While looking for a story to shoot in Northern Finland, I discovered Tinja’s existence through her website,” says Portolano, 24.
“It usually takes me some time to find the right character for such a story but I found Tinja quite quickly and immediately sent her an email, telling her about my project”.
See more via Between dusk and dawn: Off-grid with Brice Portolano in the haunting polar north | Photography | Culture | The Independent

“Foxes and Owls.”

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Twenty-one year-old Finnish photographer Konsta Punkka takes breathtaking pictures of nature and lifestyle.
We’ve written about him previously, but just can’t seem to get enough of his photos of wild animals.
Punkka manages to capture the animals from so close, it’s unbelievable. His secret?
He brings snacks to the photoshoots and feeds them to the animals.

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“The feeding thing in my photographs is more like a thing I want to show to the people, that the animals trust me and they allow me to get really close to them.
I don’t feed these guys much, just a few peanuts to get them stay close to me to take the shots”, Punkka told Bored Panda.

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More info: Instagram | 500px
See more images via Photographer Captures The Soul Of The Forest With His Unbelievably Intimate Animal Shots | Bored Panda

“Illustrations for Alice”.

tovejansson_alice7by Maria Popova
Down the rabbit-hole, Moomin-style.
As a lifelong lover of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, I was thrilled to discover one of its most glorious creative permutations over the past century and a half came from none other than beloved Swedish-speaking Finnish artist Tove Jansson.
In 1959, three years before the publication of her gorgeous illustrations for The Hobbit and nearly two decades after her iconic Moomin characters were born, Jansson was commissioned to illustrate a now-rare Swedish edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (public library), crafting a sublime fantasy experience that fuses Carroll’s Wonderland with Jansson’s Moomin Valley.

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The publisher, Åke Runnquist, thought Jansson would be a perfect fit for the project, as she had previously illustrated a Swedish translation of Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark — the 1874 book in which the word “snark” actually originated — at Runnquist’s own request.
When Runnquist received her finished illustrations in the fall of 1966, he immediately fired off an excited telegram to Jansson: “Congratulations for Alice — you have produced a masterpiece.”
What an understatement.
See more images via Tove Jansson’s Rare Vintage Illustrations for Alice in Wonderland | Brain Pickings.

These Glow-in-the-dark Reindeer stay Safe.

glowing-reindeer-014Glowing reindeer can be spotted in northern Finland thanks to a reflective spray which makes them more visible in a bid to prevent car accidents, Finnish reindeer breeders said on Tuesday.

“We are hoping that it is so useful that we can use the spray in the entire region and on all reindeer, from young to old,” said Anne Ollila, head of Finland’s Reindeer Herders’ Association.

The association has started testing two reflective sprays on the animals’ antlers so they are more visible to motorists at night.

According to Ollila, there are between 3,000 and 5,000 accidents involving reindeer every year, which are “much deadlier for the reindeer than for the drivers.”

The trial period started last week, when the association sprayed the antlers of 20 reindeer in the Rovaniemi district, the capital of the Lapland region.

The animals were sprayed with two different types of reflective liquid: a more permanent one for the antlers and one that washes away for the fur.

If the test gives positive results, the association plans to spray more animals next autumn.

Lapland, one of Europe’s most sparsely populated regions, attracts thousands of tourists especially around Christmas as it claims to be the “home of Santa Claus”.

via Finnish reindeer sprayed with glow-in-the-dark liquid to prevent accidents | World news | theguardian.com.