‘The Roaring Twenties.’

The 1920’s were most popular for the Flapper dress which is easily associated with the “Roaring Twenties”.
The Flapper dress had a drop waist, which gave women a more boyish figure which was popular at the time.
The low hemlines were also popular because it allowed women to kick up their heels in dances such as the Charleston.
Flapper dresses were adorned with embellishments, feathers.
Check out this wonderful WordPress Blog via Fashion Era: The Twenties – Primped and Proper

Olde Edwardian Style – c.1910.

Vintage fashion from the 1910s (1)

During the 1910s the Edwardians became more playful and innovative, taking an interest in asymmetrical draping techniques. Corsets and bodices were now solely for supporting the shape as opposed to changing it.
Suits were fashionable for daywear and walking became easier due to a really big fashion happening – the skirt hemline rose from the floor to the ankle.
Here’s a collection of vintage photos of fashion from the 1910s, via Europeana.
Vintage fashion from the 1910s (3)

Vintage fashion from the 1910s (4)

via vintage everyday
http://goo.gl/Ni1zYD

‘The Gibson Girls’ & Fashion in the early 1900s.

At the turn of the twentieth century, it was all about Evelyn, Camille, and Irene, the original “Gibson Girls” and the models for the drawings that changed the way America thought about women.
Though the 1890s may seem buttoned up by modern standards, they were anything but. Independent, well-read, and urbane, a new class of woman was emerging in America’s cities.
This “New Woman” did not care to be chaperoned in public. She was athletic and free-spirited. Above all, she was educated, taking advantage of new access to secondary school and college.
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Photo: Evelyn Gibson (Getty Images).
She was also scary. By the 1890s, the reform fervor of suffragists and their sisters had ceased to be cute and started to be all too real.
The status quo was being challenged by Progressive politics, new divorce laws, and women who chose to work outside the home.
Charles Dana Gibson, a popular illustrator, looked down on reform zeal in women.
And so he created “the Gibson girl,” a catch-all representation of a kinder, gentler New Woman—one who rode bikes, wore casual clothing, and flaunted her attitude, but was above all beautiful and anonymous.
By the 1910s, to visit Gibson’s office was to push your way through hundreds of gorgeous models with big hair and small waists, each vying for a go as one of Gibson’s girls.
Now read on via The Gibson Girls: The Kardashians of the Early 1900s | Mental Floss.

The Ziegfeld Girls circa 1910-1940.

Alfred Cheney Johnston (known as “Cheney” to his friends and associates) (April 8, 1885 – April 17, 1971) was a New York City-based photographer known for his portraits of Ziegfeld Follies showgirls as well as of 1920s-30s actors and actresses.
Featuring the photographs of lovely, anonymous Ziegfeld Girls by Alfred Cheney Johnston, taken from the 1910s thru the 1940s.

See more images via vintage everyday: Ziegfeld Girls from 1910-40s by Alfred Cheney Johnston

Funky Platform Shoes – the Past.

225025_LargeDo you remember the ultra funky platform shoes that were all the rage in the 1970s?
After their use in Ancient Greece for raising the height of important characters in the Greek theatre and their similar use by high-born prostitutes or courtesans in Venice in the 16th Century, platform shoes are thought to have been worn in Europe in the 18th century to avoid the muck of urban streets.
During the Qing dynasty, aristocrat Manchu women wore a form of platform shoe similar to 16th century Venetian chopine.
Platform shoes enjoyed some popularity in the United States, Europe and the UK in the 1930s, 1940s, and very early 1950s, but not nearly to the extent of their popularity in the 1970s and 1980s.
When the biggest, and most prolonged, platform shoe fad in U.S. history began at least as early as 1970 (appearing in both advertisements and articles in 1970 issues of Seventeen magazine), and continued through the late-1980s though not in Europe or the UK where they had all but died out by 1979.
At the beginning of the fad, they were worn primarily by young women in their teens and twenties, and occasionally by younger girls, older women, and (particularly during the disco era) by young men, and although they did provide added height without nearly the discomfort of spike heels, they seem to have been worn primarily for the sake of attracting attention.
Many glam rock musicians wore platform shoes as part of their act.

Sassy Ladies, 1970s

While a wide variety of styles were popular during this period, including boots, espadrilles, oxfords, sneakers, and both dressy and casual sandals of all description, with soles made of wood, cork, or synthetic materials, the most popular style of the early 1970s was a simple quarter-strap sandal with light tan water buffalo-hide straps (which darkened with age), on a beige suede-wrapped cork wedge-heel platform sole.
These were originally introduced under the brand name, “Kork-Ease.”
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Big Hair Hits Munich in the 1960s.

The prize-winning coiffures in a contest in Munich, Germany on 1 May, 1964.
They were designed for evening wear and hairdressers at the time said that anyone with a little time could copy them.
Image Credit: Photograph by AP Photo
Source: 1964: The World 50 Years Ago – The Atlantic

The Beautiful and Charismatic Lilli Langtry.

Lillie Langtry was beautiful, smart, had wit and passion all  in one mesmerizing package.
Langtry was a stage actress persuaded to go into the acting business by famed writer and poet Oscar Wilde.
As her popularity grew, more people started to gravitate towards Langtry, because of her charisma and undeniable beauty.
Whenever she entered the room at a party, all eyes were on her.
Without even asking for permission, people were drawing and painting portraits of Langtry, which quickly became postcard favourites.
But it took more than just looks for Langtry to catch the eye of Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales and later King of the United Kingdom.
Around 1877, Langtry became the semi-official mistress of the Prince because, back then, those sorts of things happened.
She wasn’t just arm-candy, of course, and often reportedly engaged Albert in meaningful conversations, and delighted him with her wit.
Even more amazingly, she is said to have had a pretty good relationship with the Prince’s wife.
Read and see more via vintage everyday: Top 10 Famous Beauties of the 19th Century

Vintage Pics of Strange Beauty Devices, 1920s-40s.

Pictures below describe how terrible beauty care procedures looked like in the 1930s and 1940s.
Women now must be happy they don’t have to spend many hours sitting under strange devices or put weird things on their faces.Unusual and Bizarre Beauty Devices in the 1930s and 1940s (1)
Permanent hair procedure. Germany, 1929
Unusual and Bizarre Beauty Devices in the 1930s and 1940s (2)
Blow-drying, 1920s.
See more Images via vintage everyday: 15 Unusual and Bizarre Beauty Devices in the 1930s and 1940s.

Amazing Photos of Models in Castles & Mansions by Miss Aniela.

“Swan Lake” (2014), all images © Natalie Lennard
Photographer Natalie Lennard, who works as Miss Aniela, creates lavish scenes centered around elegantly dressed models. While each image might seem, at first glance, like a straightforward luxury fashion shoot, further inspection reveals surreal details.
A canary yellow tulle gown morphs into birds, and ocean water splashes out of a painting frame.Miss Aniela’s fantastical scenes are created using a combination of on-site shoots with practical effects, along with extensive post-production.
The photographer explains that all images are shot on location with the model posed and lit in-frame. “Sometimes I do not know whether the image will be largely ‘raw’ and not require overt surrealism added,” Aniela shares, “until I go through the process to feel what is right for each piece.”The U.K.-based artist has been working as a fine art photographer for 13 years, getting her start with self-portraits as a university student.
In some works, she incorporates direct references to paintings from the art historical canon. Aniela has been working in her current style since 2011, and shares with Colossal that she has noticed a rising interest in her work from art collectors, as the lines between fine art and fashion are increasingly blurred.
“What He Bequeathed” (2016)
Source: Fantastical Photographs of Opulently Dressed Models in Castles and Mansions | Colossal

A 60 year old Male Fashion Model.

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I studied law but never practiced and instead worked in the movie business and advertising.
Due to personal reasons I started a new job in April 2015.
For the fun of it I decided to grow my beard thinking it would be a mess, but people said they liked it.
This happened many times and so I realized maybe I should try being a model.
I started being more careful with the way I dress and understood that maybe I had something.
That is when I went to see agencies, and that’s when my career began. I was almost 60 by then.I really love what I am doing and get great pleasure from doing it.
What else could I ask for? Maybe to work for a huge international campaign like Chanel or Dior.
We all have dreams. And this buzz could help.
Who knows.

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More info: Instagram#1Hipster Fashion Model Philippe DumasReport

See more images via 60-Year-Old Man Becomes A Fashion Model After Growing A Beard (10+ Pics) | Bored Panda