Ethereal Photos of Nature by Suzuki.

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Photographer Hidenobu Suzuki views his images as if they’re paintings.
Through gorgeous and well-considered compositions, he conveys an ethereal feeling in the Japanese landscapes. Suzuki plays with light, reflection, and field of vision to highlight nature’s splendor.
He does a fantastic job of abstracting parts of his photos – occasionally things will appear blurred – so that it feels less like documentation and more as poetry via the camera lens.
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“I feel that realism is a more Western style,” Suzuki writes on LensCulture.
“Using only rational thinking when creating photography results in better attention to the detail—but there is a tendency to get bored,” he continues. “Working with feelings and looking for emotions is more relaxing and ultimately, more powerful.”
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Suzuki intends to express feelings of spirituality in these images, and his love of quiet, contemplative moments is evident.
Through them, it’s as if we’re on the journey alone, admiring the purple sky and looking down a foggy path, savoring it all for ourselves.
Read and see more via Ethereal Photos Showcase Beautifully Quiet Moments in Nature – My Modern Met.

Hawaii was thought to be a Utopia in the1900s.

In the public consciousness at least, Hawaii has probably not changed too much in the past 100 years.
By this I mean an island chain of magnificent tropical beauty, mystery, and earthly delights with a strong emphasis on the natural world being the preferred vision for this place for many of us; with the realities of crime, squalor and all the other maladies undoubtedly present on some scale cast aside for the sake of bliss.
You see, in this chaotic world, people need and want to believe utopia by the name Hawaii must exist.
1-outrigger-canoe Detail: A.R. Gurrey Jr., American: “In measured tones subdued and low…” ca. 1910-20: vintage gelatin silver print from leaf included in volume “Idyls of Hawaii” (10.2 x 11.6 | 25.0 x 19.8 cm) Native Hawaiians are seen steering an outrigger canoe, possibly on Kaneohe Bay off the coast of Oʻahu. : From: PhotoSeed Archive
3-diamond-headDetail: A.R. Gurrey Jr., American: “Old ocean singing a psalm of delight…” (ocean view of Diamond Head in silhouette) ca. 1910-20: vintage gelatin silver print from leaf included in volume “Idyls of Hawaii” (7.8 x 11.5 | 25.0 x 19.8 cm) : From: PhotoSeed Archive
Source: The Idea of Hawaii | PhotoSeed

‘Haunting Portraits’ by Leslie Ann O’Dell.

b43523d5f735fb6f2eff73793c15a7fdc7daca53_660The ethereal beauties of Leslie Ann O’Dell’s artwork have a quality about them that is both soft yet somehow dark.
The colours fade onto the page, all except for the bold splashes of red that appear a bit disconcertingly like blood.
The artist explores concepts like isolation and the ego, offering surprisingly telling portraits that seem to unfold a story of their own.
629d182fab664b3e751b7010e76cdfc37d5ee219_660There are so many small details in O’Dell’s work that each time you look at them you will notice something you missed before, making them beautifully decorated and mysterious pieces of art.
Via Juxtapoz
See more Images via Hauntingly ethereal portraits of girls evoke loneliness and mystery | Creative Boom.

Ernst Haeckel’s Study and Illustrations of Jellyfish.

The German biologist Ernst Haeckel was fascinated by medusae, the umbrella-shaped animals commonly called jellyfish.
For Haeckel, whose imagination was shaped in the Romantic era, medusae expressed the exuberant yet fragile beauty of Nature. And in their ethereal forms he glimpsed a reflection of his great love Anna Sethe, who died tragically at the age of twenty-nine.
Haeckel had been engaged to Anna for four years when, in 1862, he became associate professor of zoology at the University of Jena.
The job gave the adoring pair the economic security they needed to finally marry. In the same year, Haeckel published a book on radiolaria (microscopic plankton) which he furnished with stunning illustrations.
In Jena, the newlyweds lived together in bliss for eighteen months. Then, on the day he was supposed to celebrate his thirtieth birthday and receive an award for his radiolaria book, Anna died suddenly, probably of a burst appendix
”Haeckel travelled to the Mediterranean town of Nice to attempt a recovery from his suicidal malaise.

One day he took a walk and saw a medusa in a rock pool: “I enjoyed several happy hours watching the play of her tentacles which hang like blond hair-ornaments from the rim of the delicate umbrella-cap and which with the softest movement would roll up into thick short spirals.”
He made a sketch and named the species Mitrocoma Annae [Anna’s headband].
Source: Ernst Haeckel’s Jellyfish – The Public Domain Review

Together in our Shadows.

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Our shadows on a late autumn’s evening in Richmond Park
The light at this time of the day is sometimes described as the golden hour.
The long shadows cast provided the ideal picture opportunity against the autumnal colours in Richmond Park.
Image Credit: Photograph: by ID7798980/GuardianWitness
See more beautiful images via Sweet harmony: readers’ photos on the theme of together | Community | The Guardian