The Futuro Spaceship House lands in Britain.

The Futuro house by Matti Suuronen … restored by Craig Barnes, on show in Le Havre. Photograph: James Hemery
Like jetpacks, flying cars and robot butlers, the Futuro was supposed to revolutionise the way we lived.
Unlike those other staples of an imagined future, however, this architectural oddity actually existed.
A colourful pod in the shape of an ellipse, the Futuro was a sci-fi vision of the future, offering us a living space light years away from what most of us were used to.
Nicknamed the Flying Saucer and the UFO House, it was symbolic of the ambitious space-race era.
But as the Futuro celebrates its 50th anniversary, the revolution it promised clearly never happened.
One belongs to Craig Barnes, an artist based in London, who saw a Futuro in a “dishevelled and tired” state while on holiday in Port Alfred, South Africa.
He decided to mount a rescue mission. “I have family out there,” he says, “and I’d been seeing this Futuro since I was about three.
I viewed it as a spaceship. I drove past in 2013 and workers were knocking down a garage next to it. I panicked and managed to trace the owner.”
Read on via Source: Back to the Futuro: the spaceship house that landed in Yorkshire | Art and design | The Guardian

Predators in 3D.

geometric-predators-by-maxim-shkret-1Maxim Shkret is an artist and designer from Krasnodar, Russia.
In a series entitled Predators on Behance, Shkret created an awesome series of animal portraits using 3DS Max, V-Ray, ZBrush and Adobe CS5.
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In the project description he describes his style as a, “3D interpretation of vector graphics”.
For those interested in prints, Maxim has some available through Society6.
via Geometric Predators by Maxim Shkret «TwistedSifter.

The Jaws Baby Crib.

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In a darkly humorous homage to classic cinema, Joseph Reginella, a toy and set-prop sculptor based in New York, has created an awesome crib that makes it look like the baby sleeping in it is about to be devoured by the monstrous shark from Jaws.
The sculpture is a reenactment of the scene where the grizzled seaman Quint is devoured by the movie’s eponymous terror.
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Reginella made the bed for his nephew, Mikey Melaccio.
Looks like the kid might develop either an extreme fear of sharks or an affinity for them!
See more Images via Uncle Makes Jaws-Inspired Crib For His 2-Month-Old Nephew | Bored Panda.

Papercraft Animals.

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Papercraft animals resembling low polygon vector illustrations.
Estudio Guardabosques are Carolina Silvero and Juan Elizalde, a couple from Buenos Aires, Argentina who likes to draw and make things with paper, specially if it involves nature.
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See more Images via Faith is Torment | Art and Design Blog: Paper Mammals by Estudio Guardabosques.

The Pathe Foundation, Paris.

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For the last 8 years the Pathe Foundation in Paris has worked with Pritzker-winning architect Renzo Piano to design and construct their new headquarters.
Slated for a grand opening, photos have emerged that reveal, in the architect’s own words, “an unexpected presence”: a curved bulbous structure that looks like it’s been squeezed into an opening within a historic Parisian city block. “
The art of inserting a new building into an historic city block,” says Piano, “means engaging in an open, physical dialogue with the existing city buildings.” In other words, it’s an exercise in reclaiming space.

Hidden mostly behind buildings, the new headquarters, which will promote the Pathe’s heritage in cinematography with office spaces, film archives and a screening room, pokes its head out above the neighbors, looking like a giant armadillo.
Walking by, an unsuspecting visitor would have no idea was behind that street-side facade.
(via Designboom)
See more via The New Pathe Foundation Headquarters by Renzo Piano Squeezed Into a City Block in Paris | Colossal.

‘The Showstopper’ by Linda van Slobbe.

The Showstopper by Linda van Slobbe – Bar-du-Lac, France
‘This historic theatre is built in a typical oval shape which has the stage at one end and multiple floors and balconies all around.
This one has beautiful decorations’
Image Credit: Photograph by Linda van Slobbe.
via The walls have eyes: the best urban photography | Cities | The Guardian