Derwombat’s Report

At our Old Guv Legends Presentation on Friday 6 July, 2018, Ian Pedler was recognised as an Old Guv Legend.
Ian started at the Guv in 1966, as an Hand Binding Apprentice.
In those days Ian was a very handsome man with lots of flowing hair and a beautiful beard.

Photo: That was good enough for Ian to attract Margaret an intelligent and attractive lady and they married in 1975.
Sadly, his looks have faded but Ian did have some brilliantly funny stories to tell the luncheon gathering.
Unfortunately, due to the cold weather numbers were slightly down. Those who braved the weather were Alex Riley, Rod Parham, Ian and Margaret Pedler, Rob and Wendy Powell, Jenny and Gary Easther, Ray Belt, David, Thelma, and Charlie Korff, Dennis Grover, Kevin Rex and Judy Stack-Neale, Keith Oxley, Wendy and David Walker, Conrad and Norma Rogers, Dennis Duthie & friends Ellen Krueger, Geoff Michell, John and Antonia Manfield, Bob Downs.
Apologies were received from Ann and Keith Heilmann, Pam Palmer, Marianne Hunn, Wayne and Angela Brown, Garth Mugford, Coralie Hills, Dave and Marilyn Harding, Trevor Roberts, Darryl O’Keefe, Eunice Wright, Judy Marks, Jack and Helen Flack, Brian Hartshorne, Barry O’Donnell, Don Woolman, Mike. Burnett, Tony Fitzsimmons, Vic Potticary.
Derwombat.

The ‘Billy’ in Australian Culture

The term billy or billycan is particularly associated with Australian usage, but is also used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.
It is widely accepted that the term “billycan” is derived from the large cans used for transporting bouilli or bully beef on Australia-bound ships or during exploration of the outback, which after use were modified for boiling water over a fire.
However there is a suggestion that the word may be associated with the Aboriginal word for water billa.
In Australia, the billy has come to symbolise the spirit of exploration of the outback.
To boil the billy most often means to make tea.
“Billy Tea” is the name of a popular brand of tea long sold in Australian grocers and supermarkets.
Billies feature in many of Henry Lawson‘s stories and poems. Banjo Paterson‘s most famous of many references to the billy is surely in the first verse and chorus of Waltzing Matilda:
“And he sang as he watched and waited ’til his billy boiled…”
The billy seems to have been used chiefly for tea making but sometimes for other cooking over an open fire or for carrying food including food gathered in the fields.
derwombat