Medieval Manticores & Blemmyes.

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Manlike monsters in medieval manuscripts take on many different forms.
The main types are man-beast hybrids, those with too few human features and those with too many.
A good example of the first type is the manticore.
It was a creature of Persian legend which found its way into medieval bestiaries via Pliny’s Naturalis Historia (a text which seems to have been an important and apparently unquestioned source for medieval writers).
Manticores were thought to have the body of a lion, a human head with three rows of sharp teeth, and a trumpet-like voice.
They could have horns, wings, or both, and they would paralyse and kill their prey – which they devoured whole – by shooting out poisonous spines.
The second type of humanoid monster includes monopods and blemmyes.
Monopods, dwarf-like creatures with a single foot extending from one leg centered in the middle of the body, were first mentioned in Aristophanes’ play The Birds (413 BC).
Pliny reports that monopods have been spotted in India, a piece of (mis)information which might have derived from sightings of Indian sadhus, who sometimes meditate on one foot.

Blemmyes from Nuremberg Chronicle 1493

The Blemmye also from the Nuremberg Chronicles.
The blemmyes are perhaps even stranger.
Blemmyes were believed to be headless cannibals living in North Africa and the Middle East, whose eyes and mouths were located on their chests.
The name comes from an ancient African tribe based in what is now Sudan; perhaps something about them or their dress made European travellers think that their heads were in their chests, although science fiction author Bruce Sterling writes about a Blemmye during the Crusades who turns out to be an extraterrestrial, so who knows…
Now read on via Manlike monsters in medieval manuscripts.

Toxodon, Darwin’s very Strange Beast, 1834.

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Toxodon. Illustration by Peter Schouten from the forthcoming book “Biggest, Fiercest, Strangest” W. Norton Publishers (in production)
“Toxodon is perhaps one of the strangest animals ever discovered,” wrote Charles Darwin, a man who was no stranger to strangeness.
He first encountered the creature in Uruguay on November 26th, 1834.
“Having heard of some giant’s bones at a neighbouring farm-house…, I rode there accompanied by my host, and purchased for the value of eighteen pence the head of the Toxodon,” he later wrote.
The beast’s skeleton, once fully assembled, was a baffling mish-mash of traits.
It was huge like a rhino, but it had the chiselling incisors of a rodent—its name means “arched tooth”—and the high-placed eyes and nostrils of a manatee or some other aquatic mammal.
“How wonderfully are the different orders, at present time so well separated, blended together in different points of the structure of the toxodon!” Darwin wrote.
Those conflicting traits have continued to confuse scientists. Hundreds of large hoofed mammals have since been found in South America, and they fall into some 280 genera.
Scientists still argue about when these mysterious beasts first evolved, whether they belong to one single group or several that evolved separately, and, mainly, which other mammals they were related too.
“That’s been difficult to address because they have features that they share with a lot of different groups from across the mammalian tree,” says Ian Barnes from the Natural History Museum in London. “To some degree, people have circled around the same set of evidence for 180 years.”
Now, Barnes’ team, including student Frido Welker from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Ross MacPhee form the American Museum of Natural History, have found a way to break out of the circle.
They recovered a hardy protein called collagen from the fossil bones of Toxodon and Macrauchenia, another South American oddity that resembled a humpless camel. By comparing these molecules to those of modern mammals, the team concluded
“Toxodon looks a bit like a hippo and we now know that the features they share with hippos are probably due to convergence,” says Barnes. “Macrauchenia looks a bit like a camel, but we can now see that it’s not particularly well related to camels.. This has been a longstanding mystery and we have an answer, and that’s satisfying.”
The discovery has bigger implications, though. Many scientists, Barnes included, have recovered DNA from very old fossils. They have sequenced the full genomes of mammoths and Neanderthals, worked out the evolutionary relationships of giant birds, and even discovered entirely new groups of early humans.
But ancient DNA has its limits.
To fish it out of fossils, you need molecular bait, and to design that bait, it really helps to know what kind of animal you’re looking for and what they’re related to. If you don’t, and your only clue is “er, some kind of mammal”, then recovering ancient DNA is hard.
It becomes harder if the fossils are also very old, since DNA has a half-life of around 521 years.
And it becomes absurdly hard if the bones come from warm climates, like most of South America, where DNA degrades even faster than usual.
via Darwin’s “Strangest” Beast Finds Place on Tree – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science.

The Shrimp that Kills With Bubbles.

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That giant claw is perfectly natural: The shrimp uses it to snap so hard that it briefly heats the water to 8,000 degrees Fahrenheit.  Photo: Arthur Anker/Flickr
The greatest real-life gunslingers have to be the pistol shrimp, aka the snapping shrimp, hundreds of species with an enormous claw they use to fire bullets of bubbles at foes, knocking them out cold or even killing them.
The resulting sound is an incredible 210 decibels, far louder than an actual gunshot, which averages around 150.
Pound for pound, pistol shrimp are some of the most powerful, most raucous critters on Earth.
Yet at the same time they are quite vulnerable, allying with all manner of creatures and even forming bizarre societies to protect themselves from the many menaces of the ocean bottom.
The Life Despotic
The pistol shrimp has two claws, a small pincer and an enormous snapper. The snapper, which can grow to up to half the length of the shrimp’s body, does not have two symmetrical halves like the pincer.
Instead, half of it is immobile, called a propus, which has a socket.
The other half, called a dactyl, is the mobile part. It has a plunger that fits into this socket.
The shrimp opens the dactyl by co-contracting both an opener and closer muscle.
This builds tension until another closer muscle contracts, setting the whole thing off with incredible force.
Continue on via Absurd Creature of the Week: The Feisty Shrimp That Kills With Bullets Made of Bubbles | Science | WIRED.

The Humped Bladderwort.

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An image taken with a microscope shows a cross section of the trap of a humped bladderwort (Utricularia gibba). Those spiky discs are friendly algae that hitch a ride inside. Photo: Igor Siwanowicz
We get a lot of press releases about photo contests, but this winning image from the Olympus BioScapes Imaging Competition (which I didn’t even know existed) stood out for a few reasons:
1. The image itself is really neat.
2. What’s actually happening in the image is also neat:
Apparently this is like a microscopic aquatic version of a Venus’ flytrap — it sucks little microinvertebrates into its trap a millisecond after they trigger its hairs.
3. It’s called a humped bladderwort, or Utricularia gibba if you wanna get technical. It’s a flowering plant that grows in ponds and lakes all over the world. (Earnest bladderwort explainer video.)
4. Speaking of technical, the process is interesting. According to press-release jargon, “Igor Siwanowicz, a neurobiologist at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Farm Research Campus … magnified the plant 100 times using a laser scanning confocal microscope and used cellulose-binding fluorescent dye Calcofluor White to visualize the cell walls of the plant.”
Siwanowicz began photographing about 10 years ago, and has a much larger collection of similar images — which you won’t regret checking out.
See and read more via And The Winner Is: The Humped Bladderwort : The Picture Show : NPR.

Sea Dragon, Galapagos Islands.

Sea Dragon: Aquatic Life Winner.
The bottom of the ocean seems an unlikely place for a lizard to find itself.
In fact, marine iguanas of the Galápagos Islands are the only lizards to venture beneath the waves—and they make a habit of it.
With food options scarce along the islands’ volcanic coastlines, marine iguanas have evolved to forage at sea.
Diving to depths of up to 25 meters on a single breath, they graze on algae that grow in the cold, nutrient-rich waters here.
A carpet of healthy green and red algae like that seen in this image by Pier Mané makes the dive itself and the time spent sunbathing on the shore to regain body heat worthwhile.
Image Credit: Photograph by Pier Mané / BigPicture Photography Competition
Source: Winners of the 2019 BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition – The Atlantic

Best Friends: ‘Riff Ratt and Osiris’.

Riff2When taxidermist Mickey Alice Kwapis saved a 4-week-old rat from becoming snake food at a reptile shop, she did not expect that this would be the beginning of an unlikely friendship.
When Riff Ratt first arrived in his new home, he needed to be bottle-fed and nursed back to health.
During his feeding sessions, Kwapis’ dog Osiris would sit by his side and carefully lick extra milk off the tiny rat.
Osiris is a Dutch shepherd therapy dog who has helped his owner rehabilitate countless homeless animals.
“We’ve trained him to be really, really gentle. He responds to the word ‘gentle,'” Kwapis stated to DNAinfo Chicago. “He’s the sweetest dog, and he’s been great with other animals.
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When Riff Ratt turned 3-months-old, the two animals proved their mutual trust as Osiris let his miniature companion crawl into his mouth and clean his teeth.
Since then, the incredible friends have become viral stars, thanks to their detailed Instagram account.
“Riff Ratt really likes licking the inside of Osiris’ mouth. I’m sure you all are wondering if we’re afraid Osiris will eat Riff – NOPE!
Osiris has helped foster and care for dozens of animals and he is the gentlest dog I’ve ever met,” writes Kwapis.
Read on and see more Images via Gentle Therapy Dog and Adorable Rescue Rat Become Unlikely Best Friends – My Modern Met.