Francis and Milo will be doing it rough over Christmas.

London, United Kingdom
Francis, 56, from south-west Scotland, and his Staffordshire bull terrier, Milo, sit on Oxford Street.
Francis has been rough sleeping in London for eight years after the death of his son and breaking up with his partner.
‘Shit happens in life,’ Francis says. ‘I’ll be right here for Christmas’
Image Credit: Photograph by Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA
Source: Obama plays Santa and Gatwick chaos: Thursday’s top photos | News | The Guardian

Classic Beauties Dressed for Christmas.

Glamorous Pics of Classic Beauties Dressed Up For Christmas
Classic beauty, celebrity and famous people, Christmas fashion and clothing.
A selection of holiday and festival, portraits featuring Ann Francis, Betty Grabel to Natalie Wood, Grace Kelly.
Here is a set of glamorous pictures that shows classic beauties dressing up for Christmas in the past.

 

See more IImages via Source: 40 Glamorous Pics of Classic Beauties Dressed Up For Christmas ~ vintage everyday

Queen Charlotte introduced the Christmas Tree to Britain in 1800.

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For some years it was assumed that Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s consort had introduced the Christmas Tree into Great Britain.
However, that honour rightfully belongs to Queen Charlotte, the German born wife of George III in December of 1800.
That year Queen Charlotte planned to hold a large Christmas party for the children of all the principal families in Windsor.
And casting about in her mind for a special treat to give the youngsters, she suddenly decided that instead of the customary yew bough, she would pot up an entire yew tree, cover it with baubles and fruit, load it with presents and stand it in the middle of the drawing-room floor at Queen’s Lodge.
Such a tree, she considered, would make an enchanting spectacle for the little ones to gaze upon.
When the children arrived at the house on the evening of Christmas Day and beheld that magical tree, all aglitter with tinsel and glass, they believed themselves transported straight to fairyland and their happiness knew no bounds.
CEMbtmLWIAA_54gQueen Charlotte.
Dr John Watkins, one of Queen Charlotte’s biographers, who attended the party, provides us with a vivid description of this captivating tree ‘from the branches of which hung bunches of sweetmeats, almonds and raisins in papers, fruits and toys, most tastefully arranged; the whole illuminated by small wax candles’.
He adds that ‘after the company had walked round and admired the tree, each child obtained a portion of the sweets it bore, together with a toy, and then all returned home quite delighted’.
Christmas trees now became all the rage in English upper-class circles, where they formed the focal point at countless children’s gatherings.
As in Germany, any handy evergreen tree might be uprooted for the purpose; yews, box trees, pines or firs. Trees placed on table tops usually also had either a Noah’s Ark or a model farm and numerous gaily-painted wooden animals set out among the presents beneath the branches to add extra allurement to the scene.
By the time Queen Charlotte died in 1818, the Christmas-tree tradition was firmly established in society, and it continued to flourish throughout the 1820s and 1830s.
The fullest description of these early English Yuletide trees is to be found in the diary of Charles Greville, the witty, cultured Clerk of the Privy Council, who in 1829 spent his Christmas holidays at Panshanger, Hertfordshire, home to Peter, 5th Earl Cowper, and his wife Lady Emily.
But it was not until periodicals such as the Illustrated London News, Cassell’s Magazine and The Graphic began to depict and describe the royal Christmas trees every year from 1845 until the late 1850s, that the custom of setting up such trees in their own homes caught on with the masses in England.
By 1860, however, there was scarcely a well-off family in the land that did not sport a Christmas tree in parlour or hall.
And all the December parties held for pauper children at this date featured gift-laden Christmas trees as their main attraction.
The spruce fir was now generally accepted as the festive tree par excellence, but the branches of these firs were no longer cut into artificial tiers or layers as in Germany, but were allowed to remain intact, with candles and ornaments arranged randomly over them, as at the present day.
via History Today.

Fuzzy Christmas Night in Athens.

using-a-plastic-lens-i-captured-how-december-nights-feel-in-athens-greece-58337c5e4e218__880For quite some time I’ve had the idea to capture the contradictions of life in Athens during the years of the economic crisis, but not in a documentary way.
December is a cold month in a mediteranean country intrinsically linked to its warm climate

michaliskoulieris-decembernights-33871-5833723d5d820__880

Christmas lights and decorations all over the city streets at Nighttime.
In a country generally connected to daylight, rain and umbrellas, are the opposite to its otherwise careless and outgoing character.

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More info: michaliskoulieris.com
Source: Using Plastic Lens, I Captured How December Nights Feel In Athens, Greece | Bored Panda

The Adoration of the Kings, 1510-15.

Photograph: National Gallery, London
The Adoration of the Kings – Jan Gossaerts (1510-15)
This colourful Christmas tree decoration of an altarpiece was painted for an abbey near Brussels and is evidently not intended to be ascetic.
The Magi who journeyed from the east to give gifts to the newborn Messiah gave wealthy people in Renaissance Europe reason to hope their riches made them virtuous.
Contrary to the early Christian message that it’s easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than a rich man to enter heaven, Gossaerts gratifies the rich by showing how they can use their treasures to adore Christ.
The superb deep blue of the sky, the reddish ruins in which Christ has been born and the green, pink, blue and gold robes of angels and mortals all add to a chromatic carol of joy and jubilation.•
National Gallery, London
Source: Kid-friendly pirates and the sublime side of Anselm Kiefer – the week in art | Art and design | The Guardian