The replicated Austrian Village of Hallstatl

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The beautiful Austrian village of Hallstatt looks like the picture-perfect postcard image of a traditional European town full of gabled homes and historic churches.
Now this lovely view can also be found in China where an exact replica of the village has been built as a high-end housing development.
Austria’s Hallstatt has a rich history dating back hundreds of years which can be seen in the historic, UNESCO-protected architecture that makes up the small town.
However China’s Hallstatt, located in the Guangdong Province, only dates back to 2012, but looks almost just as ancient.
The lovely little town was copied by the China Minmetals company who recreated some of the homes, decorations, and even the central church building as part of a novelty housing development for the wealthy who, assumedly, could not get real estate in the real Hallstatt.
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Hallstatt, China is the next evolution of the Chinese trend of replicating landmarks from other places in the world.
From scale replicas of the Sphinx and the Eiffel Tower to navigable Venetian canals, China has an ever growing number of knock-off wonders, and the recreation of an entire village is simply the grandest yet.
While the entire village has not been replicated yet, construction on the site continues and one day soon visitors may find themselves a bit turned around as to whether they are in China or Europe.
via Hallstatt, China | Atlas Obscura.

Neon Night in Beijing.

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With raindrops no longer falling, this street in Beijing, China, hums back to life under the glow of neon signs.
Your Shot photographer Caue Ferraz took this photo in the neighborhood around Jingshan Park, a 57-acre green space with views into the Forbidden City.
This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community.
Source: Nighttime Street Image, Beijing | National Geographic Photo of the Day

Synergy of Humanity by E C Tong.

It’s an open-air show about life in Lijiang long ago, using Jade Dragon Snow Mountain as a backdrop
Synergy of Humanity by EC Tong. Photograph by Eng Chung Tong
Last autumn, I travelled with a group of friends from Malaysia to Yunnan province in China.
It is a beautiful region, significantly less polluted than cities such as Beijing and rich in mountains, lakes, rice terraces and gorges.
We visited Shangri-La City, Dali, the Tiger Leaping Gorge and the Lijiang national park, where I took this shot.
We were there for a day. We spent the morning seeing the sights of the park, and in the afternoon we went to watch the Impression Lijiang show.
It is an open-air theatre performance of song and dance by one of the top directors in China, Zhang Yimou (Hero, House of Flying Daggers).
It depicts daily life in the area a long time ago. The actors are cast from the Naxi, Bai, Yi and other local ethnic minority tribes.
Source: EC Tong’s best photograph: a huge-scale recreation of Chinese harvests past | Art and design | The Guardian

Haunting Images of life inside a Steel Mill.

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Images by Photojournalist Kevin Frayer (Getty Images).
Like the other 160-plus signatories of the Paris climate agreement, China has pledged to slash its greenhouse gas emissions in the years ahead as part of a global goal of halting rising temperatures.
“Our response to climate change bears on the future of our people and the wellbeing of mankind,” Chinese President Xi Jinping has said.

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As the world’s biggest polluter, China faces an extraordinary challenge in reducing its emissions — one made all the more difficult because of the countless high-polluting factories scattered across the country.
Authorities have moved to shut down many of the worst-offending factories, but some factory owners simply pay informal “fines” to local authorities before re-opening.

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Photojournalist Kevin Frayer traveled to Inner Mongolia with Getty Images earlier this month to capture some haunting pictures of life inside one steel mill.
See more stunning  images via Buzzfeed News

Sunset at ancient City of Jiaohe.

A view of the ruins of the ancient city of Jiaohe, seen at sunset in March, 2007 in Turpan, China.
Jiaohe, was built on a 98-foot-high loess plateau over 2,300 years ago, lies in the Yarnaz Valley and is protected by the natural fortification of the precipitous cliffs.
The city has been a major passageway for communication between the East and West since the Han Dynasty and Tang Dynasty, and an important section of the ancient Silk Road.
Image Credit: Photograph by China Photos / Getty.
via A Photo Trip Along the Ancient Silk Road – The Atlantic