The Quebec City I Love.

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Rue St. Louis – Photograph by Susan Seubert
Keith Bellows, Editor in Chief, National Geographic Travel
When I was growing up, Quebec City was something of an also-ran compared to Montreal, its brasher, more idiosyncratic sibling and my hometown. My family would often drive the 150 miles up the St. Lawrence River to Quebec City, and as a kid I recall coming away a little underwhelmed. I
t seemed so dutiful and reserved next to the “sin city,” as Montreal was known. Sure, Quebec City could lay claim to a marginally more storied history—symbolized by the star-shaped Citadelle and the once bloody Plains of Abraham, where the British and French clashed over control of what would become Canada. But next to Montreal it lacked panache.
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Notre-Dame de Quebec – Photograph by Susan Seubert
No more. These days the cities have reached a comfortable détente over which has the most to offer. They are simply different. Quebec City’s warren of cobblestone streets, hulking Fairmont Le Château Frontenac, and Upper and Lower Towns are backdrop to its francophone fashion shops, chansons echoing off centuries-old cut-stone buildings, and air heavy with thick Québécois accents—a combination that’s unique in all North America. The food has gone from pedestrian to a superbly traditional force of gustatory nature (many dishes draw on local ingredients).
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Raclette – Photograph by Susan Seubert
When it turned 400 years old in 2008, Quebec City also seemed to turn a corner. Now it is a truly modern city with old bones. My advice: Learn a little French, try it out on the residents, and you’ll enter a world where the locals will help you unlock the keys to street-level Old France.
See more via I Heart Quebec City — National Geographic.

Lone Orca swims near Haida Gwaii, British Columbia.

An orca swims near Haida Gwaii (formerly the Queen Charlotte Islands), in British Columbia, Canada.
Image Credit: Photograph by Kevin Lanthier / Getty
The killer whale or orca is a toothed whale belonging to the oceanic dolphin family, of which it is the largest member.
Killer whales have a diverse diet, although individual populations often specialize in particular types of prey.
Some feed exclusively on fish, while others hunt marine mammals such as seals and other species of dolphin.
Source: A Photo Appreciation of Whales – The Atlantic

The Colourful Themed Garden of Montreal.

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Mosaiculture “is a refined horticultural art that involves creating and mounting living artworks made primarily from plants with colourful foliage (generally annuals, and occasionally perennials).” montreal-3
The 2013 was held at the Montréal Botanical Garden and features some 22,000 plant species and cultivars distributed throughout 10 exhibition greenhouses and 30 themed gardens.montreal-6
via Monumental Plant Sculptures at the 2013 Mosaicultures Internationales de Montréal | Colossal.

Amazing Light Pillars Northern Ontario.

light-pillars-night-sky-ontario-timothy-joseph-elzinga-34-58788f15cf9ee__880by Giedrė
A lot of spectacular things happen at night, and luckily there is someone to capture them while we’re sleeping tight in our beds.
Photographer Timothy Joseph Elzinga was recently woken up by his two year-old boy Gibson at 1:30 a.m. when his son spotted beautiful color lights dancing in the sky.
Timothy quickly picked up his camera and shot some amazing photos of what he later realized is a phenomenon, called “light pillars.”
“I thought it was The Northern Lights because we live in Canada,” Elzinga said. “It was a super clear night, you could see everything.

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These lights were [shooting] into the sky, blasting hundreds of feet in the air, and they were shimmering and moving.
“A light pillar is an atmospheric optical phenomenon, which is an interaction of light with ice crystals.
When the temperature drops and these crystals position themselves horizontally as they fall through the air, they act as “vessels” for light, shooting it upwards.

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More info: YouTube (h/t: petapixel, twistedsifter)
See more images via Photographer Captures Amazing Light Pillars In Northern Ontario (10+ Pics) | Bored Panda

Man keeps mowing with Tornado in the background.

Image Credit: Photograph by Cecilia Wessels.
On 2 June, it was a hot afternoon and my daughter woke from a nap saying, “Daddy doesn’t want to come inside – he’s mowing the lawn but there’s something in the sky!”
I asked my husband if he’d seen it and he said, “Yes, but everything’s fine; it’s moving away.” I took a picture of the tornado on its own to send to my parents.
It was really big, so I included my husband for perspective.
At the time, it didn’t feel dangerous at all – it was a strange moment.
See more Images via The best photographs of 2017 – by the people who shot them | Media | The Guardian

Frozen Bubbles, Banff National Park.

bdd2e3a3-8784-441a-b351-339487574d38-1420x2040Photographed in Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada, the bubbles are made from highly flammable gas methane.  Paul Zizka/Caters News Agency
Methane gas bubbles underneath Vermillion Lakes in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.
Normally the bubbles would break the surface but in low temperatures they freeze.
50182f8a-a0e6-4dde-913c-580f1842a67f-2060x1363The gas, which is emitted by bacteria after they consume dead organic matter, is fairly harmless but the bubbles can cause an explosion if lit.
3202f1bd-2e7f-4893-a332-251560c268ff-1329x2040Vermilion Lakes are a series of lakes located in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.
See more Images via Frozen bubbles in Canadian lakes – in pictures | World news | The Guardian.

Animal Murals in Vancouver.

animal-murals-leap-off-the-wall-fiona-tang-1Fiona Tang is an artist currently living in Vancouver, Canada and attending the Emily Carr University of Art and Design.
In a series of amazing large-scale murals, Tang draws animals that seem to leap off the wall. On the artist’s tumblr page, he explains:
“I started doing art a couple of years ago, and despite my parents disapproval, I have stuck to and fought for my art. I love sketching, to the point where I will catch myself looking at my surroundings as sketches.
Art is not only my passion, but also my outlet and therapy; it always manages to cheer me up.”
To see more, check out Tang’s work on tumblr and Facebook.animal-murals-leap-off-the-wall-fiona-tang-2

See more beautiful murals via Animal Murals that Seem to Leap Off the Wall «TwistedSifter.

Night Kayaking, The Rockies.

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Image Credit: Photograph by Paul Ziska.
“Working alone and out in remote locations is always time-consuming, and it involves a lot of back and forth to get the shot,” says Paul Zizka of this self-portrait he took in a kayak on Goat Lake in the Canadian Rockies.
“I had been planning on visiting this location for some time, and on this night the conditions were perfect.
The stars danced across the surface of the lake, and it felt like I was gliding through the night sky.
”Shooting a self-portrait at night isn’t without its challenges, Zizka says. Keeping yourself still enough in a kayak so the camera can catch a sharp exposure is particularly daunting.
“I propped the kayak on top of a rock to help stabilize it once I was in the frame. It took a few tries, but eventually I got a frame with sharp focus that I could be happy with.”
See more great images at Nat. Geo. via Setting Up Camp in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, Washington

Boys of the street in old Vancouver, c. 1962.

Boys on Shed, 1962
Old Vancouver was characterised by wooden houses, and photographs of those houses was a favourite subject before it was swept away by developments in the 1970s.
Image Credit: Photograph by Fred Herzog , Vancouver Art Gallery
via Lost Vancouver – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Icy Images of Montreal.

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People living in Montreal are used to extreme weather changes but not many of them have quite seen it like this.
In the middle of the fall season a cold front hit and with the winds blowing created something otherworldly.
I first had a glimpse of it from the other side of the canal.
You could see the trees covered in ice and with the sun setting I knew it would be quite a place.
So, the next day I braved the cold and made my way there.
The water sprayed through the air with the strong winds causing me to clean the lens every few seconds but I managed to get the shots.
Sadly, no frost giants found
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More info: alexrykov.com
http://goo.gl/z8tSo5
See more Images via Otherworldly Photos Of A Fall Day In Montreal | Bored Panda.