“The Chatillon Car Graveyard”.

chatillon-car-graveyard-35-640x424Photo by Theo van Vliet.
The Chatillon Car Graveyard is a neatly arrayed collection of vintage cars abandoned in the woods near Chatillon, Belgium.
The cars, originally some 500 in number, were supposedly left there by American soldiers who were stationed in Belgium after World War II.
When the soldiers returned to the United States, they were unable to ship the cars, so they left them neatly parked in the woods.
Over the years the cars have dwindled due to cleanup efforts and scavenging collectors.
The cars are faintly visible on Google Maps.
For more photos see these photo sets by Rosanne de Lange and Stefaan Beernaert.
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photo by Marcel Wiegerinck.
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photo by Marcel Wiegerinck.
See more via The Chatillon Car Graveyard, An Eerie Collection of Vintage Cars Abandoned in a Belgian Forest.

“Autochromes by Alfonse Van Besten”.

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Belgian painter Alfonse Van Besten (1865-1926) (pictured above) embraced technology, utilizing innovative color processes to transfer black and white photographs into vivid, at times lurid Autochromes.
The tableaux of his Autochromes (a technology patented by the Lumière brothers in 1903 and the first color photographic process developed on an industrial scale) are often bucolic and romantic.
Here is a dreamy Autochrome photo collection that he shot from 1910 to 1915.

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See more images via vintage everyday: 25 Dreamy Autochrome Photos Taken by Alfonse Van Besten in the 1910s

“First Book Printed in English”.

opening-two_facing_pagesLe Recueil des Histoires de Troye, a 1464 work by Raoul Lefèvre, tells a chivalirized version of the history of the city Troy. The Greek heroes, Hercules and Jason, are recast as ideal knights and founders of the Burgundian dynasty.
It was translated by William Caxton into English soon after it was written and found popularity under its new title, The Recuyell of the Histories of Troye. But these days, it is best known for its place in the literary tradition as the first book ever printed in English, and it just sold for over one million dollars.
In the prologue of the English translation, Caxton records how the “work was begun in Bruges in the County of Flanders, the first day of March, the year of the Incarnation of our said Lord God a thousand four hundred sixty and eight, and ended and finished in the holy city of Cologne 19 September, the year of our said Lord God a thousand four hundred sixty and eleven, etc.” It was to be a gift for Duke Charles’s new wife, Margaret, upon her entry into the English court.
The original hand-written copy was produced as part of a long tradition of currying royal favor. Sotheby’s, where a first printed edition was up for auction, writes that “It is unlikely that Caxton originally intended his translation for print.
He probably first encountered the printing press when he moved to Cologne in 1471 and it was almost certainly at that point that he began to consider undertaking a radically new commercial venture: printing in English.”
Postcard_-_Bruges_-_Maison_du_Franc_II_(Excelsior_Series_11,_NoThe Beautiful City of Bruges.
The young tradition of the printing press, at the time just 30 years old, favored Latin works over any particular vernacular for their ability to find a market across Europe.
Caxton, however, was confident that the cultural cache of the Burgundian court would inspire literate English nobles to embrace The Recuyell of the Histories of Troye.
Although the date of his translation is carefully recorded in the prologue, the context of that first printing is more difficult to determine.
Historians have placed it sometime between 1473 and 1475 at a workshop in Bruges.
Read more via The First Book Ever Printed in English Sells for Over a Million Dollars | Mental Floss.

Abandoned in the Ardennes.

castle-miranda-ardennes-belgiumAll images by Tom Blackwell – Lucid Dreams
This isn’t the first time Urban Ghosts has featured the forgotten Chateau de Noisy, venturing beyond the foreboding Gothic facade to scenes of dereliction and decay within.
castle-miranda-ardennes-belgium-5But this haunting series of photographs by urban explorer Tom Blackwell beautifully captures the atmosphere of the abandoned building in Belgium’s province de Namur.
Like many fine buildings that have fallen victim to decay, the 19th century neo-Gothic chateau also known as Miranda Castle has borne witness to a colourful and tumultuous history.
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See more Images via Urban Ghosts Miranda Castle: Foreboding Abandoned Mansion of the Ardennes – Urban Ghosts