The 1953 edition of Fahrenheit 451 was Lethal.

img_5255e53aa7b0aThe Special Edition of Fahrenheit 451 was bound in fire-proof asbestos (the slow and silent killer).
Ray Bradbury’s iconic dystopian novel focused on a future American society where books are outlawed and firemen hunt down and burn books rather than put out house fires.
Shortly after the book was published in 1953, a run of 200 special editions was produced.
These books, bound in white with red cover text, included both a printed signature on the cover and an actual signature inside.
More significantly, the books were bound in covers of asbestos, a fireproof mineral that has been linked to the deaths of millions of workers over many years.
Even in 1953 they were well aware of its dangers.
Image courtesy of Bauman Rare Books.
via Which Book Was Released In An Asbestos Lined Hardcover Edition?

Kent Cigarettes had Asbestos Filters in the 1950s.

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It’s hard to think of anything more reckless than adding a deadly carcinogen to a product that already causes cancer—and then bragging about the health benefits.
Yet that’s precisely what Lorillard Tobacco did 60 years ago when it introduced Kent cigarettes, whose patented “Micronite” filter contained a particularly virulent form of asbestos.
Smokers puffed their way through 13 billion Kents between March 1952 and May 1956, when Lorillard changed the filter design.
Six decades later, the legal fallout continues a Florida jury has awarded more than $3.5 million in damages to a former Kent smoker stricken with mesothelioma, an extremely rare and deadly asbestos-related cancer that typically shows up decades after the initial exposures.
Lorillard and Hollingsworth & Vose, the company that supplied the asbestos filter material, face numerous claims from mesothelioma sufferers, both factory workers who produced the cigarettes or filter material and former smokers who say they inhaled the microscopic fibers. (The companies insist that hardly any fibres escaped.)
“Micronite” one ad boasted, is “a pure, dust-free, completely harmless material that is so safe, so effective, it actually is used to help filter the air in operating rooms.”
Kent was Lorillard’s response to the health scare of the early 1950s, when the link between smoking and lung cancer began drawing wide attention. Tobacco companies scurried to roll out filters to calm jittery smokers and keep them from quitting in droves.
The health benefits would prove illusory, but the switch to filters averted the potential loss of millions of customers. “The industry’s own researchers admitted that filters did nothing to make cigarettes safer,” notes Robert Proctor, a Stanford University historian whose 2012 book, Golden Holocaust, covers Big Tobacco’s tactics in painstaking detail.
“Philip Morris scientists in 1963 admitted that ‘the illusion of filtration’ was as important as ‘the fact of filtration.”
via Remember When Big Tobacco Sold Asbestos as the “Greatest Health Protection”? | Mother Jones.

The “Lively” Champion Asbestos Gas Fire.

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Example of the World’s love affair with Asbestos, even in the 1880’s they knew of its harmful nature.
NAMPA — Chemistry professor Jerry Harris has a book in his office at Northwest Nazarene University called, “Asbestos: Silk of the Mineral Kingdom,” published in 1946.
He pulls it out when he needs a prime example of why his research on nanoparticles toxicity is important.
Asbestos is the infamous material that has cost billions of dollars to remove after it was used in millions of manufacturing projects throughout the 20th century.
But inhaling it for a long period of time has been shown to cause lung cancer and mesothelioma, among other sicknesses.
His project is one of six taking place at NNU under a $3.2 million, five-year grant from the IdeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Program, or INBRE — a grant that was just renewed at the beginning of this month.
Harris’ research centers on what can happen when a material is broken down into smaller and smaller particles, or nanoparticles.
As a substance is compressed, it can change shape and color, sometimes changing its biological factors.
“So as (researchers) are starting to look at these nanomaterials, they’re trying to avoid something like asbestos from happening again,” Harris said.
Continue on from the Idaho Press Tribune.