‘Losing the Fight’ by Aaron Gekoski.

Losing the Fight by Aaron Gekoski (UK)
Orangutans have been used in degrading performances at Safari World, Bangkok, and many other locations for decades.
Such shows were temporarily stopped in 2004 amid international pressure but they have since resumed – taking place twice a day, every day – with hundreds of people paying to watch the the clever animals box, dance, play the drums and more
Image Credit: Photograph: Aaron Gekoski,/2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year
Source: Wildlife photographer of the year: Lumix people’s choice shortlist 2019 – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

‘Winters Tale’ by Valeriy Maleev.

Winter’s Tale by Valeriy Maleev (Russia)
Maleev spotted this Pallas’s cat while it was hunting in the Mongolian grasslands.
It was bitterly cold day but the fairytale scene cancelled out the cold.
Pallas’s cats are no bigger than a domestic cat and they stalk small rodents, birds and occasionally insects
Image Credit: Photograph: Valeriy Maleev/2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year
Source: Wildlife photographer of the year: Lumix people’s choice shortlist 2019 – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

Dinagyang Festival, Iloilo City.

Dinagyang Festival
The Dinagyang Festival is an annual religious and socio-cultural gathering held in honour of Santo Niño on the fourth Sunday of January in Iloilo City, Philippines.
Image Credit: Photograph by Ariel Salupan, Lapu-Lapu City, Philippines
Member since 2019
Source: Dinagyang Festival | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

Otherworldly photo – of an Arctic city.

People in Norilsk, Russia go ice swimming even on days when the air feels like -40C – warming up in spots heated with steam from the power plant.
Norilsk is located above the Arctic Circle, east of the Yenisei River and south of the western Taymyr Peninsula. It has a permanent population of 175,000. With temporary inhabitants included, its population reaches 220,000. It is the world’s northernmost city and the second-largest city (after Murmansk) inside the Arctic Circle. Norilsk and Yakutsk are the only large cities in the continuous permafrost zone.
Norilsk was largely built by the forced labor of the Soviet-era Gulag system. The nickel deposits of Norilsk-Talnakh are the largest-known nickel-copperpalladium deposits in the world. The smelting of the nickel ore is directly responsible for severe pollution, which generally comes in the form of acid rain and smog.
Image Credit: Photograph by Elena Chernyshova
Source: BBC – Culture – Norilsk: Otherworldly photos of an Arctic city