Art by Lea Bradovich.

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I stumbled across the artwork of Lea Bradovich last month, and was knocked out. Insects merged with the sumptuous details of Botticelli and other Renaissance painters! What was the inspiration for this fascinating work?

I talked to Bradovich about the motivation for her insect and bird paintings, which she’s been creating since 2004. She’s a self-described “portrait wonk” and came up with the idea of a nature allegory; the natural world expressed in headgear and clothing.

Hats in her work display life cycles, food sources, and sometimes predators. The Renaissance style of rich saturated colors and symbolic meanings seemed like a natural match:

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Ladies of the Queen Bee’s Court. Lea Bradovich

See more via Art, Science, and an Insect Renaissance | Science Blogs | WIRED.

“Plantscapes.”

1022px-Lophophytum+Sarcophyte_sp_vMH373Four remarkable images from the 19th-century Austrian botanist Anton Kerner von Marilaun’s Pflanzenleben, one of his most important works.
Some 20 years after its initial publication in German in 1887 the work was brought to the English speaking world in a translation by F. W. Oliver under the title The Natural History of Plants their Forms, Growth, Reproduction, and Distribution.
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The images here come, via Wikimedia Commons, from Kurt Stüber’s wonderful collection of historical botanical illustrations housed at his BioLib site, definitely worth an explore.
Rhopalocnemis+Helosis_sp_vMH371via “Plantscapes” from Kerner von Marilaun’s Pflanzenleben (1887) | The Public Domain Review.

“Hurtado’s Art”.

Federico-Hurtado9Federico Hurtado is a collage artist from Buenos Aires, Argentina who combines classic portraits and vintage floral designs that results in beautiful otherworldly visuals.
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via Design You Trust
http://bit.ly/1o2QVDc

“Night Owl” by Hua Tunan.

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Chinese painter, illustrator and street artist Cheng Yingjie (a.k.a. Hua Tunan) has created an extraordinary painting called “Night Owl” that makes perfect use of his signature colorful and chaotic style.
Yingjie’s stunning and dynamic owl figure seems to materialize magically out of a chaotic cloud of splashes and splashes of colorful paint.
Like many other successful contemporary street artists, he uses a wide range of bright colors, even those don’t actually appear in owls, like green, blue and purple.
His dynamic style, while definitely his own, is similar to the work done by many other notable street artists, including that of DALeast.
Not surprisingly, Yingjie’s art has been in fairly high demand, as he is a leader in the contemporary Chinese art community.
And yet, this is one of the few times that he has actually offered his art up for sale to the public.
He has created 35 copies of this owl by hand to sell to the public, each with its own little unique hand-drawn subtleties.
via Artist Creates Stunning Owl Painting With Chaotic Splashes Of Color | Bored Panda.

A Guide to Calligraphy.

16342033551_1624cf667a_bJoris Hoefnagel (1542 – 1600) was a pivotal figure in the history of Dutch art, playing an important role both in the latter stages of the Flemish illumination tradition and the birth of the new genre of still life.
In the last decade of his life Hoefnagel was appointed court artist to Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II, and it was in this time that he appended Georg Bocskay’s Model Book of Calligraphy, of thirty years previous, with his own beautifully exquisite Guide to the Construction of Letters, examples from which are shown below.
In each he surrounds the typographic diagram with a colourful array of symbolically charged motifs and, for some, an excerpt from the Bible which begins with the letter of focus.
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See the Getty site, by clicking on each image, for further commentary.
[Source] The Getty
via Hoefnagel’s Guide to Constructing the Letters (ca. 1595) | The Public Domain Review.