‘The Hollywood Ten’.

When the House on Un-American Activities Committee subpoenaed filmmakers to testify about communism in the industry, a few held their ground — and for a time, lost their livelihood.
hollywood_ten
Courtesy of PhotofestIt
A call from the Committee was the casting call no one in Hollywood wanted to receive. In October 1947, when the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) convened a hearing in Washington, D.C., to investigate subversive activities in the entertainment industry, 41 screenwriters, directors and producers were subpoenaed.
Most witnesses were “friendly” — that is, willing to respond to the committee’s central question: “Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?”
And those who confessed to membership were offered the opportunity to name “fellow travellers,” thereby regaining their good standing with the committee and, by extension, the American film industry.
Ten witnesses — all current or former party members — banded together in protest, refusing to cooperate on First Amendment grounds (freedom of speech, right of assembly and freedom of association).
The HUAC disagreed and found the so-called Hollywood Ten in contempt of Congress, fined them each $1,000 and sentenced them to up to a year in federal prison.
All 10 artists also were fired by a group of studio executives — and the era of the Hollywood blacklist began.
Read the full article via The Hollywood Ten: The Men Who Refused to Name Names – Hollywood Reporter

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