Carniverous Plants under the Glass Dome at Huntington Gardens, Pasadena.

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by Annetta Black
The glass-domed conservatory at Huntington Gardens is home to many exotic plants, but tucked away in one of the wings is a special boggy environment dedicated to the most delightful plants of them all: the meat eaters.

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On display within the massive 16,000 square-foot Rose Hills Foundation Conservatory are numerous species of unusual carnivorous plants, including American pitcher plants, sundews, Venus flytraps, and butterworts.

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One example is the Sarracenia trumpet pitcher, native to the eastern United States, it flowers in the spring with a pretty little blossom and a distinctive smell, not unlike cat urine.
The pitchers are actually the leaves of the plant, and form slippery funnels that attract and trap curious insects.
Larger pitcher plants can trap and digest a full grown rat.
In comparison, the Drosera, or sundew, relies on hundreds of tiny sticky drops along their leaves to trap and digest insects.
There are more than 194 known species of sundews, making it the largest genera of carnivorous plant.
The humble looking Pinguicula, or Butterwort, with its pretty and unassuming purple blooms, uses a similar technique, trapping small insects on its sticky leaves.
Read on via Carnivorous Plants at the Huntington Gardens | Atlas Obscura.

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