A Great example of Aussie Slang: Frank Hardy’s “The Outcasts of Foolgarah.”

There can be few languages, or dialects, with a stronger history of slang than Australian English.
Australian slang really built up a head of steam in the late 19th Century.
This was partly down to the fact that the kind of people who came to Australia, tended to come from places with rich local linguistic traditions like Scotland, Ireland and the East End of London.
These people weren’t hampered by the upper-class cultures of Great Britain.
They were much more free to play with language, creating nicknames for local things, in a way that the buttoned-up Brits in those days couldn’t do.
Slang was strongly linked with very poor convicts and the British policy of setting up penal colonies in Australia.
There was a very strong connection with the so-called lower classes in the development of Australian Slang.
They were their own people and so developed their own slang terms that reflected their mateship and life.
One of the great exponents of the use of slang in literature was the boisterous storyteller Frank Hardy.
I don’t think I’ve ever read a book so rich in Aussie terms than “The Outcasts of Foolgarah”.
An outrageous romp amongst the waste disposal (night soil) experts that roamed the backyards of Sydney many years ago.
derwombat

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