Paolo Veronese “The Happy Painter” 1528-1588, Italy.

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Veronese main Photograph: The National Gallery Photographi The National Gallery Photographi/PR
by Michael Prodger
To the contemporary viewer, Paolo Veronese, 1528‑1588, is a conundrum.
How can one of the greatest of all painters not be a great artist, too? The answer was inadvertently suggested by one of his most ardent admirers, Henry James: “Never did an artist take a greater delight in life, seeing it all as a kind of breezy festival,” he wrote.
“He was the happiest of painters and produced the happiest pictures in the world.”
Happiness is a trait that does not always play well now: we might prefer that Veronese displayed instead a hint of Michelangelo’s terribilità, Leonardo’s intellectual restlessness or Titian’s all-encompassing human sympathy.
To his contemporaries, however, the pomp and celebration to be found in his pictures were not defects but his distinguishing triumphs.
Giorgio Vasari, the Florence-centric painter and artist-biographer, was sufficiently impressed by Veronese’s art and status to include the Venice-based painter in his second edition of The Lives of the Artists.
Read  on via Why Veronese produced the happiest pictures in the world | Art and design | The Guardian.

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