Why did Dickens have a personal postbox?

_79613790_studyIn the 19th Century, when the postal service was in its infancy, Charles Dickens lobbied for his own personal letterbox, writes Kathryn Westcott.
It’s Christmas 1869 and Charles Dickens, prolific letter writer, is hurriedly finishing off a correspondence. “The postman is waiting at the gate to tramp through the snow to Rochester and is unlawfully drinking a glass of gin while I write this,” Dickens reveals to his friend Charles Kent.
The postman was a familiar sight at Dickens’s Georgian home, Gad’s Hill Place in Higham, Kent.
A postbox, installed by the postal service at the author’s request, was one of the earliest wall-boxes to be introduced in Britain, following the introduction of the pillar box across the nation by fellow writer Anthony Trollope in 1852.
Dickens had personally lobbied for that postbox in 1859.
Perhaps acting on a tip-off by friend and writer Edmund Yates, who worked in the Postmaster General’s office, he replies to a correspondence from Yates stating:
“I think that no one seeing the place can well doubt that my house at Gad’s Hill is the place for the letter-box. The wall is accessible by all sorts and conditions of men, on the bold high road, and the house altogether is the great landmark of the whole neighbourhood. Captain Goldsmith’s house is up a lane considerably off the high road; but he has a garden wall abutting on the road itself…”
Continue article via BBC News – Why did Charles Dickens have a personal postbox?

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