The New Face of Hunger.

The New Face of Hunger.

Millions of working Americans don’t know where their next meal is coming from. We sent three photographers to explore hunger in three very different parts of the United States, each giving different faces to the same statistic: One-sixth of Americans don’t have enough food to eat. On a gold-gray morning in Mitchell County, Iowa, Christina … Continue reading

The Type Smelter.

The Type Smelter.

By the way the bloke pictured here is about 9 inches taller than me and built like a brick shithouse. One of my first jobs of a morning when I entered the dog box we called the Comp Room at N.P.I. was to switch on the Lead melting pot. It was electrically operated and would … Continue reading

“Cut to the Chase.”

“Cut to the Chase.”

A rectangular metal frame called a chase was the basis of printing for many years. The type was placed on a flat surface called a stone (metal) and locked into postition. This photograph shows the bottom right hand corner of a chase into which type – in this case lines of type (sometimes called slugs) … Continue reading

Paintings by Mike Worrall.

Paintings by Mike Worrall.

Poets corner Born 1942 in Matlock Derbyshire, UK, Mike Worrall is a self taught artist. As a child Mike was always intrigued by paintings involving some sought of mystery element. He was interested in Dreams and Subconscious thoughts and the weirdness of how we go from one thought to another in an almost drifting process. … Continue reading

Paris during Nazi occupation.

Paris during Nazi occupation.

By Jonathan Yardley Like so much else that happened in France during World War II, the Nazi occupation of Paris was something entirely more complex and ambiguous than has generally been understood. We tend to think of those four years as difficult but minimally destructive by comparison with the hell the Nazis wreaked elsewhere in … Continue reading

The Art of Swimming (1587).

The Art of Swimming (1587).

llustrations from Everard Digby’s De Arte Natandi (The Art of Swimming) published in 1587, considered the first English treatise on the practice. Divided into two parts, the first is largely theoretical (Digby wrote in Latin, though it would be translated into English by Christopher Middleton eight years later). The second part is concerned with practical … Continue reading